Block 30 Labs: Powering DigiByte to build Digital Asset Indexes

Announced as a speaker at the first DigiByte Global Summit next month, Block 30 Labs is at the forefront of bringing tokenised asset trading to a mass scale, collaborating with DigiByte blockchain.

With its headquarters in San Diego, at the heart California’s tech hub, Block 30 Labs is developing tools to enable digital asset indexes in the blockchain era. The team is a network of global blockchain technologists, computer scientists, economists, financial engineers, researchers and global media alumni from Yale, Harvard, Georgetown, Wharton, Duke, Stanford, UCSB and UCLA — all gathered to develop top-notch financial and trading platforms built on blockchain.

Block 30 Labs is developing three core applications of decentralised blockchain technology for global adoption by consumers, merchants and the Fortune 500 enterprises for release in their 2019–2020 roadmap.

To kick off the project, Block 30 team studied the Alibaba platform and its success in the Chinese market. Block 30 CEO Brian McLaren Foote says the team drew inspiration from the way Alibaba streamlined new technology to create an innovative and efficient consumer experience.

The Chinese giant is indeed one of the most pertinent references in terms of e-commerce, digital payments and interoperability — and Block 30 hopes to replicate this comprehensive and innovative approach for the digital assets market.

Blockchain & E-commerce

The speed and convenience of mobile as a shopping and payment gateway keeps attracting more and more users each year. The use of blockchain technology in ecommerce and digital payments can bring these services to the next level in an already very profitable market: recent data shows that worldwide mobile payment revenue should exceed $1 trillion in 2019 and more than 2.1B consumers are expected to use mobile payments this year. The degree to which online and mobile sales are growing shows the importance of developing a marketplace capable of dealing of tons of data in a commercially viable manner.

The Alibaba Group, Block 30’s role model, is reportedly studying the implementation of blockchain technology into cross-border supply chains. The group already deploys blockchain for other functionalities in their platforms, as well as Internet of Things (IoT).

The main problems in ecommerce nowadays are related to payments checkouts, cybersecurity and supply chain management. By putting an end to intermediary bodies, blockchain can transform ecommerce into a much faster and safer process.

The advantage of using blockchain in ecommerce is the integration and ownership of digital assets — challenging traditional monopolies and protecting users. For example, retailers can launch ICOs directly on the platform and distribute tokens among their customer base. Credit card brands like MasterCard are reportedly working with blockchain to make its market payment systems more fit for use.

The Block 30 index helps to accurately measure the value and performance of digital assets. It is one of the very first US indexes to help investors track multiple factors in the market beyond Bitcoin. With a growing number of Security Token Offerings (STOs) in 2019, the market requires increasingly sophisticated tools to assess the real value of digital assets.

“We hope that the BLOCK 30 Index can help improve industry coverage “Beyond Bitcoin” via global media, government, research and regulatory institutions — while also providing better safeguards and clarity for retail investors seeking early exposure to the front-end of a potential economic cycle,” says Brian Foote.

Block 30 Labs is working on three projects:

1. The BLOCK 30 Marketplace: the world’s first Web 3.0 marketplace built on blockchain. The platform will pair global buyers and sellers for exchanges of value on the blockchain, including: concert tickets, automotive, hospitality, businesses, land, farms, wineries, fractional ownership, mixed use development and commercial real estate.

2. The BLOCK 30 Pay Digital Wallet, which will be available at checkout on the BLOCK 30 Marketplace to help global customers and merchants begin to adopt and use digital assets vs. credit cards through an asset called BLOCKS, powered by DigiByte.

3. The BLOCK 30 Financial Division, which will provide BLOCK 30 Pay digital wallet holders the ability to invest in customised security tokens (ex: BLOCK 5, BLOCK 10, BLOCK 30, etc.) directly from their mobile phone.

In the Web 3.0, the internet will come back into the hands of its users, thanks to decentralisation and distributed consensus protocols. The new model emphasises sharing and collaborating among users in order to concentrate data and operability in the hands of a few companies — known nowadays as ‘big tech’.

But, in order to function in the Web 3.0, blockchain platforms will need to address interoperability — a feature Block 30 Labs is priming. Being interoperable means that a specific blockchain network is able to recognise and operate with others. Without this, blockchain nodes are isolated from those outside, secluded in their own network.

The aim is to allow different blockchain projects to communicate with one another, regardless of their structures, offering more possibilities for users and greater versatility for different projects to be integrated.

Block 30 platforms are built on DigiByte blockchain, which is the longest and fastest blockchain currently available in the crypto market. Despite not being among the most prominent cryptocurrencies, DigiByte holds the potential to be so much more than a digital currency, particularly because of DigiAssets.

For over 2 years, the DigiByte team has been working on this feature that allows other organisations to build their projects on top of DigiByte. DigiByte was designed to scale on-chain, hence maintaining its core aspects of security and decentralisation. Partnerships and collaborations on new projects to change the way people transact and communicate are absolutely vital to the development and wider adoption of DigiByte.

The full digital asset marketplace addresses sectors beyond just store of wealth, such as supply chain management, financial services, social networks, data security, digital identity, gaming, mediums of exchange and privacy. A true representative and comprehensive index should enable exposure to all major thematic sectors, rather than just a small selection, and begin to mirror some of the key sectors that drive global capital markets indexes. In light of this, DigiByte’s DigiAssets were presented as the perfect fit to develop Block 30.

Rudy Bouwman from the DigiByte Awareness Team believes the partnership is extremely positive for DigiByte and goes to show the versatility and user value of DigiAssets: “We’re very excited about the collaboration between DigiByte and Block 30 Labs. Their solutions and services are built on DigiByte Technology and DigiAssets platform, and with that they would be able to position DigiByte in front of consumers, investors, merchants and companies, even Fortune 500. We believe this can drive DigiByte up the ranks significantly in terms of market cap, awareness and adoption.”

DigiByte founder Jared Tate believes Block 30 is a huge step towards eventual mass adoption of DGB technology: “By leveraging the speed, scalability and security of the DigiByte blockchain as the backbone of their offerings, BLOCK 30 Labs will pierce the secondary layers of the consumer, merchant and professional enterprise world, which is a huge milestone along the journey for mass global adoption of the DigiByte ecosystem.”

Stefania Barbaglio, official PR for DigiByte commented: “It is all about collaborating on game-changing projects with good partners. Over the last year DigiByte has proved its potential as forward-thinking blockchain technology with varied partnership on innovative applications and solutions to secure, facilitate, promote faster transactions of assets. Block 30 is a revolutionary team that will accelerate the decentralisation of consumer and enterprise adoption, asset tokenisation and more accessible 1st-3rd world financial cooperation on the blockchain. The e-commerce place is ripe for change and DigiByte and Block30 team are initiating this disruption. The DigiByte team and community are extremely excited about their future announcements at the conference.”

Brian Foote joins a group of high-calibre speakers presenting at the Summit discussing how a future powered by decentralised technologies and Digibyte will look. Confirmed speakers include DigiByte founder Jared Tate; Official DigiByte PR Stefania Barbaglio; Rudy Bouwman, the founder of DGBAT, the DigiByte Awareness Team; the founders and lead developers of V-ID and Antum ID; and Vertbase Founders, Justin Seidl and Stuart Menzies.

DigiByte Global Summit

April 19th, 2019

De Balie

Kleine-Gartmanplantsoen 10, 1017 RR

Amsterdam, Netherlands

Registration open: http://digibytesummit.io

Mining transformed by digital revolution and clean energy shift

The mining industry is undergoing a core transformation — from the way operations work to the rising demand for base metals. Propelled by technology, pressing ethical standards and the fourth industrial revolution, the mining sector has been rethinking its approach to business since 2017.

Leveraging on the global energy transition propelled by governments and companies around the world aiming to reduce carbon emissions, as well as demand for metals for use in infrastructure in emerging economies, miners are working to meet the needs of a changing world.

S&P believes copper and zinc will be in the spotlight in the near future. In fact, China’s zinc demand could rise more than predicted in 2019 as infrastructure fixed asset investment growth accelerates to 10% from 3.8% last year, while a pick-up in construction is likely to spur zinc demand and heat up the market, according to Bloomberg Intelligence.

In anticipation of the expanding production of electric vehicles, demand for battery metals is growing, becoming the main opportunity in mining. Demand for lithium is expected to soar, as well as graphite, nickel and copper, confirming the trend for the use of base metals in batteries and storage. Copper is a fundamental metal for electric vehicles, and according to the International Energy Agency, their number will increase 1,389% — to 125 million from three million — by 2030, and 3,333% in 2040 to 300 million.

“Looking back just 20 years, it’d have been hard to believe that nickel, lithium, cobalt and graphite would be an affordable way to power batteries,” says Phil Hopwood, Global Mining Leader at Deloitte. “Today that is the reality and a potential growth opportunity, particularly with the emergence of electric vehicles.”

Hopwood also highlights that in order to succeed in this changing scenario, companies need to think long term when implementing their strategies, by studying trends and market opportunities and embracing digital innovation. “I see mining really making changes in terms of adopting digital technology and innovative thinking,” he added.

The integration of disruptive technologies into operations and risk management can be one of the pivotal points to enhance activity. Artificial Intelligence, AI, has proven very beneficial. Scenario planning enhanced by AI offers a structured way to consider unpredictable futures, equipping executives and engineers with information they can use to make more strategic choices.

Thanks to the power of AI mining, companies can identify ore bodies in greenfield and/or remote areas without access to pre-existing geological data. EARTH AI, for example, uses machine learning to analyse geophysical data to identify unexplored mineralisation opportunities in Australia. Since April 2018, it has discovered 18 new greenfield prospects with significant copper, zinc, lead, and vanadium mineralisation.

Blockchain, another hyped disruptive technology, can offer multiple advantages to mining companies. An ever-growing consumer awareness means that ethical and corporate responsibility has become a central concern for companies. With the use of blockchain, all the steps in natural resources exploration can be recorded and disclosed, holding companies to account.

Blockchain technology has the capacity to store a huge amount of data on an open, secure and accurate platform. A decentralised digital ledger network can record, track, verify and share each and every element of all the assets in one single network, which is open to public access. It can pull together links all along the chain, from raw material providers right up to retailers. Such technology can help fight slavery, child labour and environmental concerns.

In the realm of precious metals, palladium is surging, also promoted by automotive industry demand. For the first time in more than a decade, palladium is rivalling gold in value. The key drive to rising prices is increasing demand combined with long-term constrained supply.

The palladium price reached as high as $1 400/oz in January 2018, making it ‘the most precious of precious metals,” says Mining Review.

In terms of industry revenue, growth will be stable but much less impressive compared with the sharp increase seen in 2017. For the world’s top 40 miners, 2017 was an outstanding year due to the continuing recovery in commodity prices, fuelled by general economic growth, resulting in revenues rising dramatically by 23 per cent.

For 2019 and 2020, S&P Global Ratings expect relatively flat revenues across the upstream and downstream sectors.

Keep an eye out for our upcoming episode on Financial Fox about new trends in mining and the impact on digitisation. Follow us on @cassiopeia_ltd and subscribe to our YouTube channel.

New approach to the mining sector.

St-Georges Eco-Mining Corp. operates as a mineral exploration and production company. The Company explores gold, platinum, palladium, rhodium, copper, cobalt, nickel, and other base metals. St-Georges Eco-Mining develops its projects in Canada and Iceland.

St-Georges is developing new technologies to solve the some of the most common environmental problems in the mining industry. Part of the strategy of the company is to invest and develop technologies that address corporate responsibility issues underlying the mining industry, and by addressing these flaws, will make mining more sustainable and accountable.

The Company controls directly or indirectly, through rights of first refusal, all of the active mineral tenures in Iceland. It also explores for nickel on the Julie Nickel Project & for industrial minerals on Quebec’s North Shore and for lithium and rare metals in Northern Quebec and in the Abitibi region. Headquartered in Montreal, St-Georges’ stock is listed on the CSE under the symbol SX, on the US OTC under the Symbol SXOOF and on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange under the symbol 85G1.

St Georges’ business model is straightforward: the company develops metal processing technologies to be deployed to change the environmental impact of mining operations around the world, while improving the profitability and the financial bottom line of current base metals producers.

More countries join European Blockchain Partnership making Europe a leading force in blockchain…

More countries join European Blockchain Partnership making Europe a leading force in blockchain research

This week, Hungary has joined the European Blockchain Partnership, becoming the 29th member country. The partnership is led by the European Union Blockchain Observatory and Forum, which aims to accelerate blockchain innovation and the development of the blockchain ecosystem within the European Union. More than that, the objective of the forum is to promote education, understanding and research around blockchain.

The EU Blockchain Observatory and Forum was launched by the European Commission in February last year. It will see the investment of 300 million euros into projects that support the use and adoption of blockchain technology for economic, technical and societal changes. The forum plans to become an articulator between researchers and the EU, make the most appropriate recommendations, and oversee initiatives and implementations throughout the member countries. It will also aid in creating more appropriate regulations in the region.

The forum is part of the the Horizon 2020 programme, the largest Research and Innovation programme ever launched by the EU. It will make €80 billion of funding available over 7 years, from 2014 to 2020, to support the EU’s reach for excellence in the area.

Blockchain, as one of the most important technologies introduced by the Fourth Industrial Revolution, has immense industrial and technical value. The European Commission understands that blockchain is not merely about finance, even though this is the area in which the benefits are already most tangible.

Beyond the finance realm, blockchain can support the development of more sophisticated and secure internet systems, as well as being integrated into other industries beyond finance — such as agriculture, education, healthcare, to name only a few.

In fact, among the projects that have already received funding are two projects focused on services: MHDMD, a blockchain platform to enable safe and effective transmission and storage of medical data; , and DECODE, a system providing tools affording individuals the ability to control whether they keep their personal data private or share it for the public good.

“Blockchain is a great opportunity for Europe and Member States to rethink their information systems, to promote user trust and the protection of personal data, to help create new business opportunities and to establish new areas of leadership, benefiting citizens, public services and companies,” said Mariya Gabriel, Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society at the launch of the partnership.

“The Partnership launched today enables Member States to work together with the European Commission to turn the enormous potential of blockchain technology into better services for citizens.”

Beyond the hype around cryptocurrencies and ICOs, which often still holds back investment and adoption, blockchain technology can have an immensely positive impact. This advanced technology can help states manage unified digital identities, gain more control over supply chains, introduce smart contracts and even prevent fraudulent actions.

Blockchain is also part of the European Commission’s Fintech Action Plan, a 23-step strategy designed to increase the adoption of new technologies, create a business-friendly environment, increase cybersecurity and consumer protection and allow for integrity of the financial system across the EU backed by new technologies.

The Fintech plan will also present a blueprint with best practices on regulatory sandboxes, based on guidance from European Supervisory Authorities. A regulatory sandbox is a framework set up by regulators to allow FinTech startups and other innovators to conduct live experiments in a controlled environment, under a regulator’s supervision.

“The position taken by the European Commission shows professionalism, commitment and open-mindness towards embracing the benefits of disruptive technologies. It shows the EU understands the potential of blockchain beyond media and market speculation, and serves as an example for other governments around the world who are still reluctant in welcoming this powerful technology,” says Stefania Barbaglio, Director at Cassiopeia Services, leading PR firm in the blockchain space.

More countries join European Blockchain Partnership making Europe a leading force in blockchain…

More countries join European Blockchain Partnership making Europe a leading force in blockchain research

This week, Hungary has joined the European Blockchain Partnership, becoming the 29th member country. The partnership is led by the European Union Blockchain Observatory and Forum, which aims to accelerate blockchain innovation and the development of the blockchain ecosystem within the European Union. More than that, the objective of the forum is to promote education, understanding and research around blockchain.

The EU Blockchain Observatory and Forum was launched by the European Commission in February last year. It will see the investment of 300 million euros into projects that support the use and adoption of blockchain technology for economic, technical and societal changes. The forum plans to become an articulator between researchers and the EU, make the most appropriate recommendations, and oversee initiatives and implementations throughout the member countries. It will also aid in creating more appropriate regulations in the region.

The forum is part of the the Horizon 2020 programme, the largest Research and Innovation programme ever launched by the EU. It will make €80 billion of funding available over 7 years, from 2014 to 2020, to support the EU’s reach for excellence in the area.

Blockchain, as one of the most important technologies introduced by the Fourth Industrial Revolution, has immense industrial and technical value. The European Commission understands that blockchain is not merely about finance, even though this is the area in which the benefits are already most tangible.

Beyond the finance realm, blockchain can support the development of more sophisticated and secure internet systems, as well as being integrated into other industries beyond finance — such as agriculture, education, healthcare, to name only a few.

In fact, among the projects that have already received funding are two projects focused on services: MHDMD, a blockchain platform to enable safe and effective transmission and storage of medical data; , and DECODE, a system providing tools affording individuals the ability to control whether they keep their personal data private or share it for the public good.

“Blockchain is a great opportunity for Europe and Member States to rethink their information systems, to promote user trust and the protection of personal data, to help create new business opportunities and to establish new areas of leadership, benefiting citizens, public services and companies,” said Mariya Gabriel, Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society at the launch of the partnership.

“The Partnership launched today enables Member States to work together with the European Commission to turn the enormous potential of blockchain technology into better services for citizens.”

Beyond the hype around cryptocurrencies and ICOs, which often still holds back investment and adoption, blockchain technology can have an immensely positive impact. This advanced technology can help states manage unified digital identities, gain more control over supply chains, introduce smart contracts and even prevent fraudulent actions.

Blockchain is also part of the European Commission’s Fintech Action Plan, a 23-step strategy designed to increase the adoption of new technologies, create a business-friendly environment, increase cybersecurity and consumer protection and allow for integrity of the financial system across the EU backed by new technologies.

The Fintech plan will also present a blueprint with best practices on regulatory sandboxes, based on guidance from European Supervisory Authorities. A regulatory sandbox is a framework set up by regulators to allow FinTech startups and other innovators to conduct live experiments in a controlled environment, under a regulator’s supervision.

“The position taken by the European Commission shows professionalism, commitment and open-mindness towards embracing the benefits of disruptive technologies. It shows the EU understands the potential of blockchain beyond media and market speculation, and serves as an example for other governments around the world who are still reluctant in welcoming this powerful technology,” says Stefania Barbaglio, Director at Cassiopeia Services, leading PR firm in the blockchain space.

World leaders focus on technology and governance in Davos

The World Economic Forum is one of the world’s most important political and economic events. Every January, leaders and business personalities from around the globe gather in Davos for a week of discussions about urgent issues affecting societies today. This year, after months of rampant security and privacy scandals, as well as multiple social media crises, key figures got together to assess how technology can be deployed in a safe and constructive manner.

The theme for 2019 was Globalisation 4.0 and the spirit underpinning the event was international cooperation for solutions to improve global order. In times of economic uncertainty and political fragmentation, the forum was a chance for the world’s most prominent figures to discuss how technology can help improve people’s quality of life, particularly in emerging economies and developing countries.

Technology is no doubt a hot topic for governments and business leaders. The Fourth Industrial Revolution, aided by the development of disruptive technologies such as artificial intelligence and blockchain, is projected to unlock $3.7 trillion in economic value by 2025.

Speaking of disruptive technologies, Google CEO Sundar Pichai highlighted in his keynote interview that we can expect significant developments in AI for the coming months. Pichai said that AI has a fundamental role in the new phase of globalisation and reshaping understanding of technology uses.

“AI is probably the most important thing humans have ever worked on,” said Pichai. “I think of it as something more profound than electricity and fire. Any time you work with technology, you need to learn how to harness the benefits while minimising the downsides. Stepping back, when you think about a lot of problems in the world, we typically have a constraint on resources. AI for the first time offers a different construct.”

But whilst Globalisation 4.0 brings many economic opportunities, it also poses challenges. Concerns over data privacy, cyber security and fake news are some of the most relevant examples of the unwanted consequences of widespread technological developments. The Davos meeting’s exact purpose was to shine a light on those problems and call for collective international action.

One of the important pieces of news in the 2019 forum was the launch of WEF’s Global Center for Cybersecurity, which will be headquartered in Geneva and start activities in March. The Center will work alongside governments and companies in the private sector to facilitate information gathering and sharing. It will also develop strategies such as the Cyber Resilience Playbook to help create appropriate regulatory frameworks to enhance cybersecurity practices.

Also touching on sensitive topics, German Chancellor Angela Merkel spoke about the urgency with which governments need to act in taking care of data privacy. Germany is a major defender of the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and has a strict set of social media rules. The Chancellor emphasised the intrinsic value of data in the current global scenario and the great responsibility that companies carry when handling individuals’ personal information.

“Data will be the raw material of the 21st century. The question ‘who owns that data?’ will decide whether democracy, the participatory social model, and economic prosperity can be combined,” said Merkel.

In regards to regulations, the forum offered a much-needed chance for businesses and governments to engage in dialogue. Mark Benioff, CEO of Salesforce, highlighted that the tech industry will continue to evolve, regardless of the influence of authorities. The most effective solution, he says, is to make sure regulators hold companies to account when it comes to malpractices.

“The point of regulators and government is to come in and point true north. In the tech industry, we’ve been remarkably clear of those regulatory concerns for the whole industry’s lifespan. We’re seeing signs now, maybe we’re not completely there yet, but especially when you see what happened with the election and social networks and with CEOs who fully abdicate their responsibilities and say I had no idea this was happening,” said Benioff

“There’s no way regulators can keep up with the speed of technology, but they can play a role with accountability,” he added.

European Blockchain Partnership aims to contribute to the creation of an environment in full compliance with EU regualtion and with clear governance models to help blockchain technology grow in Europe via Spot9

If in developed nations, the discussions were mostly about the setbacks caused by technology; when it comes to emerging markets, tech is offering opportunity and growth. One of the key presences in Davos this year was Jack Ma, CEO of Alibaba, the ‘Amazon of China’.

Ma said that the growth of e-commerce and digital payments has contributed immensely to economic growth in the past years — and that it will continue to do so.

“E-commerce is the future,” said Ma. “E-commerce will replace a lot of traditional ways of doing business. In the past 20 years with poor logistics, terrible payments, and terrible internet connections, e-commerce has still grown like this for our platform in China for the last 15 years. Last year, sales were more than $750 billion USD, almost ranking number 21 in country’s GDP.”

The Fourth Industrial Revolution has indeed made a great impact on emerging markets and developing countries. Blockchain, for example, has enabled the emergence of multiple platforms that offered digital banking for large unbanked populations, giving them access to financial services as well as allowing cross-border payments for remittances in a fast and cost-effective way.

Keep an eye out for more upcoming news on disruptive technologies and the impact of the Fourth Industrial revolution on society. Follow us on @cassiopeia_ltd and subscribe to our YouTube channel for interviews with technology experts.

World leaders focus on technology and governance in Davos

The World Economic Forum is one of the world’s most important political and economic events. Every January, leaders and business personalities from around the globe gather in Davos for a week of discussions about urgent issues affecting societies today. This year, after months of rampant security and privacy scandals, as well as multiple social media crises, key figures got together to assess how technology can be deployed in a safe and constructive manner.

The theme for 2019 was Globalisation 4.0 and the spirit underpinning the event was international cooperation for solutions to improve global order. In times of economic uncertainty and political fragmentation, the forum was a chance for the world’s most prominent figures to discuss how technology can help improve people’s quality of life, particularly in emerging economies and developing countries.

Technology is no doubt a hot topic for governments and business leaders. The Fourth Industrial Revolution, aided by the development of disruptive technologies such as artificial intelligence and blockchain, is projected to unlock $3.7 trillion in economic value by 2025.

Speaking of disruptive technologies, Google CEO Sundar Pichai highlighted in his keynote interview that we can expect significant developments in AI for the coming months. Pichai said that AI has a fundamental role in the new phase of globalisation and reshaping understanding of technology uses.

“AI is probably the most important thing humans have ever worked on,” said Pichai. “I think of it as something more profound than electricity and fire. Any time you work with technology, you need to learn how to harness the benefits while minimising the downsides. Stepping back, when you think about a lot of problems in the world, we typically have a constraint on resources. AI for the first time offers a different construct.”

But whilst Globalisation 4.0 brings many economic opportunities, it also poses challenges. Concerns over data privacy, cyber security and fake news are some of the most relevant examples of the unwanted consequences of widespread technological developments. The Davos meeting’s exact purpose was to shine a light on those problems and call for collective international action.

One of the important pieces of news in the 2019 forum was the launch of WEF’s Global Center for Cybersecurity, which will be headquartered in Geneva and start activities in March. The Center will work alongside governments and companies in the private sector to facilitate information gathering and sharing. It will also develop strategies such as the Cyber Resilience Playbook to help create appropriate regulatory frameworks to enhance cybersecurity practices.

Also touching on sensitive topics, German Chancellor Angela Merkel spoke about the urgency with which governments need to act in taking care of data privacy. Germany is a major defender of the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and has a strict set of social media rules. The Chancellor emphasised the intrinsic value of data in the current global scenario and the great responsibility that companies carry when handling individuals’ personal information.

“Data will be the raw material of the 21st century. The question ‘who owns that data?’ will decide whether democracy, the participatory social model, and economic prosperity can be combined,” said Merkel.

In regards to regulations, the forum offered a much-needed chance for businesses and governments to engage in dialogue. Mark Benioff, CEO of Salesforce, highlighted that the tech industry will continue to evolve, regardless of the influence of authorities. The most effective solution, he says, is to make sure regulators hold companies to account when it comes to malpractices.

“The point of regulators and government is to come in and point true north. In the tech industry, we’ve been remarkably clear of those regulatory concerns for the whole industry’s lifespan. We’re seeing signs now, maybe we’re not completely there yet, but especially when you see what happened with the election and social networks and with CEOs who fully abdicate their responsibilities and say I had no idea this was happening,” said Benioff

“There’s no way regulators can keep up with the speed of technology, but they can play a role with accountability,” he added.

European Blockchain Partnership aims to contribute to the creation of an environment in full compliance with EU regualtion and with clear governance models to help blockchain technology grow in Europe via Spot9

If in developed nations, the discussions were mostly about the setbacks caused by technology; when it comes to emerging markets, tech is offering opportunity and growth. One of the key presences in Davos this year was Jack Ma, CEO of Alibaba, the ‘Amazon of China’.

Ma said that the growth of e-commerce and digital payments has contributed immensely to economic growth in the past years — and that it will continue to do so.

“E-commerce is the future,” said Ma. “E-commerce will replace a lot of traditional ways of doing business. In the past 20 years with poor logistics, terrible payments, and terrible internet connections, e-commerce has still grown like this for our platform in China for the last 15 years. Last year, sales were more than $750 billion USD, almost ranking number 21 in country’s GDP.”

The Fourth Industrial Revolution has indeed made a great impact on emerging markets and developing countries. Blockchain, for example, has enabled the emergence of multiple platforms that offered digital banking for large unbanked populations, giving them access to financial services as well as allowing cross-border payments for remittances in a fast and cost-effective way.

Keep an eye out for more upcoming news on disruptive technologies and the impact of the Fourth Industrial revolution on society. Follow us on @cassiopeia_ltd and subscribe to our YouTube channel for interviews with technology experts.

Calls for crypto regulation gather momentum around the world

As the crypto market matures and gains relevance within the global economy, executives, investors and even public bodies worldwide are calling for clearer crypto regulations.

In 2017 we witnessed the ‘Bitcoin boom’, with skyrocketing prices and major attention driven towards cryptocurrencies.

Since the Bitcoin Boom in 2017, the crypto market has exploded with Initial Coin Offerings — the controversial ICOs — with many of those projects, under the flag of the crypto revolution, proving to be nothing more than artifice designed to trick eager investors into putting money into a business that was never realised.

Nevertheless, the high number of fraudulent ICOs is more a representation of dubious morals than a testament of the actual revolutionary nature of blockchain. The challenge posed by the introduction of cryptocurrencies and tokens has allowed for an expansion of investment opportunities for new groups of investors, as well as giving millions of unbanked people around the world an alternative means of finance.

This realisation is slowly spreading among financial regulators, which are now exploring the ways that crypto technology can be integrated into the widerfinancial and regulatory market framework.

In recent months, with the rise in the popularity of tokenised securities — a SEC-compliant class of digital assets, comparable to equities stocks — the theme of regulation is spreading across the crypto space.

At the moment, although the EU does not present a unified framework regarding cryptocurrencies — regulations vary by state members — the European Central Bank has shown plenty of initiatives in exploring ways to regulate and manage cryptocurrencies.

In the beginning of 2019 alone, two major European regulatory bodies, the European Banking Authority (EBA) and the European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) have publicly called for better assessments of crypto technology and its impacts in order to develop appropriate regulations.

In an official statement, the EBA said it is calling for regulations to protect investors above all, and has asked the European Commission for a comprehensive analysis to assess whether unified crypto rules are needed across the region. In addition, the ESMA’s recommendations advise the EU Commission on the current regulations which can be suitably applied to crypto assets.

In the emerging markets scene, where the positive effects of cryptocurrencies are more tangible, calls for regulation have also risen, with movements urging authorities to work on implementing and regulating cryptocurrencies.

In India, where the legalisation of digital currencies has become a divisive topic, the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) has put a ban on banks and any regulated financial institutions from “dealing with or settling virtual currencies”. The move in April 2018 sparked backlash from crypto enthusiasts, who defend their right to enjoy alternative finance means.

The CEO of India-based Cryptocurrency Exchange WazirX, Nischal Shetty, kicked off a social media campaign to attract the attention of Indian financial regulators over the need for ‘positive regulation’ ofcryptocurrencies, which provide the Indian population with an innovative, necessary and accessible tool for economic growth: “Please bring positive regulations in crypto and over 5 million crypto Indians will be thankful to you. Youth of India have found a new way to make wealth & this is especially important when there are not enough jobs for everyone,” he said.

Crypto experts have already stated that 2019 should be “the year of crypto regulation” and represents an important move towards allowing the blockchain revolution to truly thrive and improve financial practices around the world.

“Regulations are a necessary step to take the crypto industry to the next level. We have seen numerous cases of fraud and scams in the ICO space in the last couple of years, which has put off institutional investors and created a sense of distrust in crypto projects. However, with a regulatory framework in place, cryptocurrencies and tokens are no longer products of mere speculation. They have become real assets. It benefits both the investor side and companies themselves, and shows the maturity of the crypto market,” says Stefania Barbaglio, Director at Cassiopeia Services, leading crypto & blockchain PR.

Keep an eye out for upcoming interview with Nischal Shetty about the crypto scene in India and the impact of cryptocurrencies on emerging markets. Follow us on @cassiopeia_ltd and subscribe to our YouTube channel FinancialFox.

Calls for crypto regulation gather momentum around the world

As the crypto market matures and gains relevance within the global economy, executives, investors and even public bodies worldwide are calling for clearer crypto regulations.

In 2017 we witnessed the ‘Bitcoin boom’, with skyrocketing prices and major attention driven towards cryptocurrencies.

Since the Bitcoin Boom in 2017, the crypto market has exploded with Initial Coin Offerings — the controversial ICOs — with many of those projects, under the flag of the crypto revolution, proving to be nothing more than artifice designed to trick eager investors into putting money into a business that was never realised.

Nevertheless, the high number of fraudulent ICOs is more a representation of dubious morals than a testament of the actual revolutionary nature of blockchain. The challenge posed by the introduction of cryptocurrencies and tokens has allowed for an expansion of investment opportunities for new groups of investors, as well as giving millions of unbanked people around the world an alternative means of finance.

This realisation is slowly spreading among financial regulators, which are now exploring the ways that crypto technology can be integrated into the widerfinancial and regulatory market framework.

In recent months, with the rise in the popularity of tokenised securities — a SEC-compliant class of digital assets, comparable to equities stocks — the theme of regulation is spreading across the crypto space.

At the moment, although the EU does not present a unified framework regarding cryptocurrencies — regulations vary by state members — the European Central Bank has shown plenty of initiatives in exploring ways to regulate and manage cryptocurrencies.

In the beginning of 2019 alone, two major European regulatory bodies, the European Banking Authority (EBA) and the European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) have publicly called for better assessments of crypto technology and its impacts in order to develop appropriate regulations.

In an official statement, the EBA said it is calling for regulations to protect investors above all, and has asked the European Commission for a comprehensive analysis to assess whether unified crypto rules are needed across the region. In addition, the ESMA’s recommendations advise the EU Commission on the current regulations which can be suitably applied to crypto assets.

In the emerging markets scene, where the positive effects of cryptocurrencies are more tangible, calls for regulation have also risen, with movements urging authorities to work on implementing and regulating cryptocurrencies.

In India, where the legalisation of digital currencies has become a divisive topic, the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) has put a ban on banks and any regulated financial institutions from “dealing with or settling virtual currencies”. The move in April 2018 sparked backlash from crypto enthusiasts, who defend their right to enjoy alternative finance means.

The CEO of India-based Cryptocurrency Exchange WazirX, Nischal Shetty, kicked off a social media campaign to attract the attention of Indian financial regulators over the need for ‘positive regulation’ ofcryptocurrencies, which provide the Indian population with an innovative, necessary and accessible tool for economic growth: “Please bring positive regulations in crypto and over 5 million crypto Indians will be thankful to you. Youth of India have found a new way to make wealth & this is especially important when there are not enough jobs for everyone,” he said.

Crypto experts have already stated that 2019 should be “the year of crypto regulation” and represents an important move towards allowing the blockchain revolution to truly thrive and improve financial practices around the world.

“Regulations are a necessary step to take the crypto industry to the next level. We have seen numerous cases of fraud and scams in the ICO space in the last couple of years, which has put off institutional investors and created a sense of distrust in crypto projects. However, with a regulatory framework in place, cryptocurrencies and tokens are no longer products of mere speculation. They have become real assets. It benefits both the investor side and companies themselves, and shows the maturity of the crypto market,” says Stefania Barbaglio, Director at Cassiopeia Services, leading crypto & blockchain PR.

Keep an eye out for upcoming interview with Nischal Shetty about the crypto scene in India and the impact of cryptocurrencies on emerging markets. Follow us on @cassiopeia_ltd and subscribe to our YouTube channel FinancialFox.

The era of digital trading: New technologies to transform trading landscape

Commodity trading is no revolutionary activity; yet, the introduction of digital technologies over the last few years has enabled the development of a new environment and advanced practices, better aligned to meet the objectives of traders and investors.

Estimates show that about $10 trillion worth of commodities are produced and consumed per annum globally. Each of these commodities completes its cycle along the supply chain, but until now it had not been possible to integrate and exchange information between them.

The convenience and speed brought by the digitisation of trading opens the commodities markets to new classes of investors, with the need for more transparent and efficient commodity trading practices being addressed through open-sourced technologies. The very same disruptive technologies which are being deployed in various other industries, particularly prominent in fintech, can also make trading a more efficient and reliable undertaking.

The digitisation of trading includes the implementation of tech features into systems to allow better performance, as well as initiating a shift in the structure of assets themselves: digital assets are increasingly popular and comparable to traditional equity stocks, with the advantage of being more user-friendly and accessible.

If on one hand, digital assets are democratising the market, the digital tools within their structure help with understanding and processing of the cycles and behaviours of commodities trading, allowing for better informed decisions and improved risk management. They also provide closer estimates and predictions about demand, markets swings and external sentiment.

The rise of Digital & Tokenised Securities

The new year started on full steam around tokenised securities, with the recent launch of a trading platform by DX.Exchange that allows investors to buy the security tokens of popular Nasdaq-listed companies, such as Apple, Tesla, Facebook and Netflix.

“By tokenizing stocks of some of the biggest publicly-traded companies like Google, Amazon, Facebook and more, we are opening an untapped market of millions of old and new traders around the globe cutting out the middleman,” said Amedeo Moscato, DX’s chief operating officer to CNBC.

The important difference is that STOs are asset-backed and fall within regulatory parameters, working similarly to the way IPOs do in the equities market. Therefore, security tokens are naturally less susceptible to market volatility and offer better security to both investors and companies.

With tokenised securities, tokens can be transacted on a global scale, allowing borderless transactions 24/7 anywhere in the world regardless of business hours and time zones, even outside market hours. Thus, tokens are bound to become increasingly popular and regulatory frameworks should continue addressing them more fully.

Usually stored in smartphone-based digital wallets, tokens are secure and immutable, representing a more attractive alternative to the old environment of the stock market.

These digital assets are supported by the integration of other technology intrinsic to market and trading mechanisms, especially artificial intelligence, blockchain and biodata.

● The terms Artificial intelligence and machine learning represent computer software that learns automatically through patterns in stored data. The implementation of AI algorithms into trading systems generates improved responses through a predetermined logic, which leads to more accurate results and reduced costs and losses.

● In the realms of both physical commodities or digital assets, Blockchain is a useful technology as it allows storage and transactions to be optimised. More than enabling cryptocurrencies and tokens, because of its decentralisation, automated data and strong security framework, blockchain is an ideal underlying structural technology for new trading platforms .

● Some innovative mechanisms are working beyond the trading machinery to improve activity at human level as well. Platforms such as NeuroTrader harness biodata and AI within a platform designed to optimise trader performance. Based on studies around trader behaviour, the platform uses neuro and psychological information to stipulate the best trading decisions. The purpose is to create an advanced risk-management tool for professional traders and mitigate losses.

“The new generation of digital technologies like AI, blockchain and Big Data, are very versatile.They can be deployed to various ends to meet different needs across virtually all industries. In the case of trading, these new tools add value to investor experience and nurture a more transparent and open environment,” says Stefania Barbaglio, Director at Cassiopeia Services.

The era of digital trading: New technologies to transform trading landscape

Commodity trading is no revolutionary activity; yet, the introduction of digital technologies over the last few years has enabled the development of a new environment and advanced practices, better aligned to meet the objectives of traders and investors.

Estimates show that about $10 trillion worth of commodities are produced and consumed per annum globally. Each of these commodities completes its cycle along the supply chain, but until now it had not been possible to integrate and exchange information between them.

The convenience and speed brought by the digitisation of trading opens the commodities markets to new classes of investors, with the need for more transparent and efficient commodity trading practices being addressed through open-sourced technologies. The very same disruptive technologies which are being deployed in various other industries, particularly prominent in fintech, can also make trading a more efficient and reliable undertaking.

The digitisation of trading includes the implementation of tech features into systems to allow better performance, as well as initiating a shift in the structure of assets themselves: digital assets are increasingly popular and comparable to traditional equity stocks, with the advantage of being more user-friendly and accessible.

If on one hand, digital assets are democratising the market, the digital tools within their structure help with understanding and processing of the cycles and behaviours of commodities trading, allowing for better informed decisions and improved risk management. They also provide closer estimates and predictions about demand, markets swings and external sentiment.

The rise of Digital & Tokenised Securities

The new year started on full steam around tokenised securities, with the recent launch of a trading platform by DX.Exchange that allows investors to buy the security tokens of popular Nasdaq-listed companies, such as Apple, Tesla, Facebook and Netflix.

“By tokenizing stocks of some of the biggest publicly-traded companies like Google, Amazon, Facebook and more, we are opening an untapped market of millions of old and new traders around the globe cutting out the middleman,” said Amedeo Moscato, DX’s chief operating officer to CNBC.

The important difference is that STOs are asset-backed and fall within regulatory parameters, working similarly to the way IPOs do in the equities market. Therefore, security tokens are naturally less susceptible to market volatility and offer better security to both investors and companies.

With tokenised securities, tokens can be transacted on a global scale, allowing borderless transactions 24/7 anywhere in the world regardless of business hours and time zones, even outside market hours. Thus, tokens are bound to become increasingly popular and regulatory frameworks should continue addressing them more fully.

Usually stored in smartphone-based digital wallets, tokens are secure and immutable, representing a more attractive alternative to the old environment of the stock market.

These digital assets are supported by the integration of other technology intrinsic to market and trading mechanisms, especially artificial intelligence, blockchain and biodata.

● The terms Artificial intelligence and machine learning represent computer software that learns automatically through patterns in stored data. The implementation of AI algorithms into trading systems generates improved responses through a predetermined logic, which leads to more accurate results and reduced costs and losses.

● In the realms of both physical commodities or digital assets, Blockchain is a useful technology as it allows storage and transactions to be optimised. More than enabling cryptocurrencies and tokens, because of its decentralisation, automated data and strong security framework, blockchain is an ideal underlying structural technology for new trading platforms .

● Some innovative mechanisms are working beyond the trading machinery to improve activity at human level as well. Platforms such as NeuroTrader harness biodata and AI within a platform designed to optimise trader performance. Based on studies around trader behaviour, the platform uses neuro and psychological information to stipulate the best trading decisions. The purpose is to create an advanced risk-management tool for professional traders and mitigate losses.

“The new generation of digital technologies like AI, blockchain and Big Data, are very versatile.They can be deployed to various ends to meet different needs across virtually all industries. In the case of trading, these new tools add value to investor experience and nurture a more transparent and open environment,” says Stefania Barbaglio, Director at Cassiopeia Services.