Ulticoin: The cryptocurrency gamers have been waiting for

The multi-billion dollar gaming market is about to witness a brand new project leveraging on blockchain technology to give players the chance of cashing in ‘real money’ from their gaming tokens.

The gaming industry helped drive the internet, certainly in the social media age where social gaming and microtransactions have become a flourishing industry in their own right. Now, the industry could be helping to spur the growth of blockchain technology and increase adoption of cryptocurrencies.

Numbers indicate there are more than 25,000 e-gaming platforms worldwide, generating altogether between USD$20 to 40 billion in revenue. Online gaming is expected to grow by over 11% a year until 2020. This impressive growth is mostly down to new technologies enhancing current gaming experiences and creating niches in the market.

In 2017 alone, the gaming industry generated $108.4 billion in revenue. The good sentiment is also felt on the investment side in an increasing interest in blockchain appliances from gaming companies. Over the last few years, there have been more than 50 ICOs for gaming-focused projects, the top 10 fundraisers reaching over $323 million alone.

Among many features, the introduction of blockchain technology in games offers more security to players, can increase number and variety of elements and allows more sophisticated features.

The integration of blockchain into gaming is seen as a positive move within the crypto space. Gamers are known to be early adopters of new technologies and their familiarity with tokens and virtual currencies can help drive adoption of cryptocurrencies wider.

ULTI Coin: Exchange gaming tokens for real currencies

Aiming to reach the core of the popular and expanding gaming industry, blockchain developers decided to create ULTICoin.

The coin started to be designed in 2017 by a team of experts in gaming — and gamers themselves — who understanding the market very well spotted the opportunity of deploying crypto technology to unlock the billions of dollars that are locked inside video games features and different realities.

ULTI Coin is the first-of-its-kind allowing players to get ‘real’ money’ from their games. ULTI Coin is new cryptocurrency that implements and manages in-game virtual currencies. Purpose of ULTICoin is exchanging in-game currencies for ULTI Tokens, which allows gamers to become users of ULTICoin, and exchange ULTI Tokens for at currencies or any other in-game currency.

“Our aim is to partner with as many gaming companies as possible. In any game, you gather tokens which now with ULTI coin can be exchanged for real money,” said Nadja Jovovic, consultant at ULTCoin.

“Our project is built on Ethereum blockchain, which means users get the speed, safety and transparency from Ethereum network,” said Sergej Belavin, senior consultant at ULTI Coin

ULTI will soon be listed on different crypto exchanges around the world which will allow gamers to trade their gaming coins to other cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, and eventually fiat values.

The team behind the idea and development of ULTI Coin have long experience in the gaming industry, offering expert insight and understanding of what it takes to make ULTI successful in the market. Sinisa Milic, CEO and Petar Bozic, Co-Founder, have combined knowlegde of engineerging business and share a passion for exploring the possibilities of decentralised technologies.

Stefania Barbaglio, Cassiopeia Director and Blockchain PR Strategist and Advisor to ULTICoin, commented: “There are 25,000 e-gaming platforms worldwide, which generate USD$20 to 40 billion in revenue, a figure set to continue growing . ULTICoin is the first ‘real money’ token in gaming, a new cryptocurrency that manages in-game virtual currencies, enabling gamers to unlock the billions of dollars inside video game features.”

Ulticoin: The cryptocurrency gamers have been waiting for

The multi-billion dollar gaming market is about to witness a brand new project leveraging on blockchain technology to give players the chance of cashing in ‘real money’ from their gaming tokens.

The gaming industry helped drive the internet, certainly in the social media age where social gaming and microtransactions have become a flourishing industry in their own right. Now, the industry could be helping to spur the growth of blockchain technology and increase adoption of cryptocurrencies.

Numbers indicate there are more than 25,000 e-gaming platforms worldwide, generating altogether between USD$20 to 40 billion in revenue. Online gaming is expected to grow by over 11% a year until 2020. This impressive growth is mostly down to new technologies enhancing current gaming experiences and creating niches in the market.

In 2017 alone, the gaming industry generated $108.4 billion in revenue. The good sentiment is also felt on the investment side in an increasing interest in blockchain appliances from gaming companies. Over the last few years, there have been more than 50 ICOs for gaming-focused projects, the top 10 fundraisers reaching over $323 million alone.

Among many features, the introduction of blockchain technology in games offers more security to players, can increase number and variety of elements and allows more sophisticated features.

The integration of blockchain into gaming is seen as a positive move within the crypto space. Gamers are known to be early adopters of new technologies and their familiarity with tokens and virtual currencies can help drive adoption of cryptocurrencies wider.

ULTI Coin: Exchange gaming tokens for real currencies

Aiming to reach the core of the popular and expanding gaming industry, blockchain developers decided to create ULTICoin.

The coin started to be designed in 2017 by a team of experts in gaming — and gamers themselves — who understanding the market very well spotted the opportunity of deploying crypto technology to unlock the billions of dollars that are locked inside video games features and different realities.

ULTI Coin is the first-of-its-kind allowing players to get ‘real’ money’ from their games. ULTI Coin is new cryptocurrency that implements and manages in-game virtual currencies. Purpose of ULTICoin is exchanging in-game currencies for ULTI Tokens, which allows gamers to become users of ULTICoin, and exchange ULTI Tokens for at currencies or any other in-game currency.

“Our aim is to partner with as many gaming companies as possible. In any game, you gather tokens which now with ULTI coin can be exchanged for real money,” said Nadja Jovovic, consultant at ULTCoin.

“Our project is built on Ethereum blockchain, which means users get the speed, safety and transparency from Ethereum network,” said Sergej Belavin, senior consultant at ULTI Coin

ULTI will soon be listed on different crypto exchanges around the world which will allow gamers to trade their gaming coins to other cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, and eventually fiat values.

The team behind the idea and development of ULTI Coin have long experience in the gaming industry, offering expert insight and understanding of what it takes to make ULTI successful in the market. Sinisa Milic, CEO and Petar Bozic, Co-Founder, have combined knowlegde of engineerging business and share a passion for exploring the possibilities of decentralised technologies.

Stefania Barbaglio, Cassiopeia Director and Blockchain PR Strategist and Advisor to ULTICoin, commented: “There are 25,000 e-gaming platforms worldwide, which generate USD$20 to 40 billion in revenue, a figure set to continue growing . ULTICoin is the first ‘real money’ token in gaming, a new cryptocurrency that manages in-game virtual currencies, enabling gamers to unlock the billions of dollars inside video game features.”

NeuroTrader: Harnessing biodata to optimise real-time trading performance

There are many factors one should consider before making decisions in the trading process. Whereas research about company performance, market outlook and stock trends are certainly important, there is also a psychological element that is very often overlooked by investors, which holds them back from gaining better returns from their trading activities.

Trading activity, often assumed to be based on logical and analytical behaviour in order to balance out the inherent risk and possible gains, is often strongly impacted by the trader’s state of mind. Stress, excitement and overstimulation are among the many variables which can lead to risky trading decisions and potential losses. The forces affecting trading decisions are indeed multifactorial but directly impact the outcomes.

Very often, financial losses can be attributed to poor decision making arising from fear, trepidation and anxiety, each of which show specific biological patterns. When investors get too emotionally involved with trading, they are more apt to take greater risks, which quite possibly lead to less favourable returns. Financial gains, on the other hand, tend to result from clarity and optimism, which have their own biological patterns, better known as “biomarkers”.

Emotions such as fear and greed are common in a trader’s daily life. Stocks and markets are, after all, fluid systems and bad news is bound to crop up. however, these emotions are misleading and as result, compromise trading performance. In order to ensure better results, traders should discipline themselves to override their instincts and move past the emotional response. This reflects on the figures; only 5% of traders make a profit at the end of the year.A reliable solution to prevent emotions from hindering optimal trading performance is a tool which provides insights into the trader’s neurosystem, informing smarter decisions. But is there such a solution without resorting to algorithms or robots?

NeuroTrader is a suite of software applications which can enhance traders’ decision-making effectiveness with wearable technology. Based on the concept of trading as a peak performance sport, NeuroTrader is creating the science of optimal decision making.

Real-time monitoring of the traders and their biodata provides an opportunity to mitigate risk, optimise performance and create stable and consistent rates of return as a function of the traders’ biological responses to price and market sentiment.

NeuroTrader is the system to help investors make better choices based on clinical analysis and objectivity. By analysing biodata collected via wearable technology, NeuroTrader can discern different human performance states and therefore inform trading decisions based upon the biological state of the trader, providing an advanced risk-management tool for every trade.

Neurotrader is initiating its pilot program in February next year, in which it will be monitoring 100 traders globally over a 6-month period. The NeuroTrader team, with 10 years of research and testing in the field, expect the platform to mitigate on average 20% of trading errors.

The industry has already taken the route of eliminating humans from trading and using machine learning to improve trading results, but the problem for financial institutions is that they have misunderstood the limitations of these technologies.

“There is a perfect middle ground where machines assist human performance; this is a paradigm-shift where machines serve people to achieve greater heights, not to make them redundant,” says Ken Medanic, the creator and founder of NeuroTrader.

NeuroTrader promises to be one of the first technologies to improve behavioural patterns in trading activity — suitable for both individuals and institutional investors. Hear more about this exciting tool in person. Don’t miss NeuroTrader’s presentation at Cassiopeia Investor Symposium! Register here

NeuroTrader: Harnessing biodata to optimise real-time trading performance

There are many factors one should consider before making decisions in the trading process. Whereas research about company performance, market outlook and stock trends are certainly important, there is also a psychological element that is very often overlooked by investors, which holds them back from gaining better returns from their trading activities.

Trading activity, often assumed to be based on logical and analytical behaviour in order to balance out the inherent risk and possible gains, is often strongly impacted by the trader’s state of mind. Stress, excitement and overstimulation are among the many variables which can lead to risky trading decisions and potential losses. The forces affecting trading decisions are indeed multifactorial but directly impact the outcomes.

Very often, financial losses can be attributed to poor decision making arising from fear, trepidation and anxiety, each of which show specific biological patterns. When investors get too emotionally involved with trading, they are more apt to take greater risks, which quite possibly lead to less favourable returns. Financial gains, on the other hand, tend to result from clarity and optimism, which have their own biological patterns, better known as “biomarkers”.

Emotions such as fear and greed are common in a trader’s daily life. Stocks and markets are, after all, fluid systems and bad news is bound to crop up. however, these emotions are misleading and as result, compromise trading performance. In order to ensure better results, traders should discipline themselves to override their instincts and move past the emotional response. This reflects on the figures; only 5% of traders make a profit at the end of the year.A reliable solution to prevent emotions from hindering optimal trading performance is a tool which provides insights into the trader’s neurosystem, informing smarter decisions. But is there such a solution without resorting to algorithms or robots?

NeuroTrader is a suite of software applications which can enhance traders’ decision-making effectiveness with wearable technology. Based on the concept of trading as a peak performance sport, NeuroTrader is creating the science of optimal decision making.

Real-time monitoring of the traders and their biodata provides an opportunity to mitigate risk, optimise performance and create stable and consistent rates of return as a function of the traders’ biological responses to price and market sentiment.

NeuroTrader is the system to help investors make better choices based on clinical analysis and objectivity. By analysing biodata collected via wearable technology, NeuroTrader can discern different human performance states and therefore inform trading decisions based upon the biological state of the trader, providing an advanced risk-management tool for every trade.

Neurotrader is initiating its pilot program in February next year, in which it will be monitoring 100 traders globally over a 6-month period. The NeuroTrader team, with 10 years of research and testing in the field, expect the platform to mitigate on average 20% of trading errors.

The industry has already taken the route of eliminating humans from trading and using machine learning to improve trading results, but the problem for financial institutions is that they have misunderstood the limitations of these technologies.

“There is a perfect middle ground where machines assist human performance; this is a paradigm-shift where machines serve people to achieve greater heights, not to make them redundant,” says Ken Medanic, the creator and founder of NeuroTrader.

NeuroTrader promises to be one of the first technologies to improve behavioural patterns in trading activity — suitable for both individuals and institutional investors. Hear more about this exciting tool in person. Don’t miss NeuroTrader’s presentation at Cassiopeia Investor Symposium! Register here

The future is both smart and kind: Google moves forward with AI to promote social change

The digital revolution is more than just the digitalisation of businesses and services: it is about shaping the economy to be more inclusive, fair and human-centric. The multi-billion tech industry seems to be waking up to the fact that, in this field, success means extending consideration to people and the planet.

After years of heavy investment in and research into innovative tools to create and improve user experience online, Google has now pledged to deploying its expertise to develop technologies for social good.

A main focus for Google is artificial intelligence applications for positive societal impact. Since the launch of Google AI last year, the tech giant has been engaged in various enterprises within the AI space as it seeks projects that deploy this technology to positively impact society.

Whilst technology has proven to be the key for social change in the digital era, innovation is a fluid process and requires corporate responsibility from tech companies in addressing some of the most important questions underlying society. Fundamentally, technology is only truly powerful if it is accessible by and inclusive to all, rather than remaining a tool for the few, developed and used by the intellectual elites of the world.

Despite being a couple years on from the big AI boom, machine learning is still a very dynamic and evolving technology. Its influences are already palpable and visible in our everyday life, such as intelligent personal assistants on our smartphones and algorithms on social media and streaming services.

A true AI system is one that can learn on its own, improving on past iterations, getting ever smarter and more aware and enhancing its capabilities and knowledge. For example, algorithms that recognise patterns are applied in trading and financing. The fact that we are able to use such complex technology in such simple terms is a testimony to what computers are capable of, when utilised efficiently.

On top of that, the AI market is doubtless attractive: Bank of America Merrill reckon the market will blossom to $153bn over the next five years — $83bn for robots, and $70bn for artificial intelligence-based systems. That compares to roughly $58bn in 2014.

The integration of AI into different sectors surely has the potential to boost Google’s already developed services to the next level. In fact, AI is set to become of the main drivers behind the tech improving customer experience in financial services, manufacturing and entertainment, among other fields.

Nevertheless, AI is not a complete redemption technology, and the technological developments made without human input are not enough to ensure that AI is completely fair and transparent. The responses provided by machine learning replicate the patterns on which they are constructed, so inevitably reflect the views and perspectives of its developers.

So, how can an AI systems empathise with socially excluded groups if the creators themselves are not able to understand the problems of demographics other than their own? After all, AI can only solve the problems it is programmed to identify. In this sense, automated systems call for human sensitivity and mechanisms of trust.

Challenging the biases found within artificially intelligent mechanisms is one of the greatest concerns around the diffusion of AI systems into different sectors. The answer could be in the coupling of AI with decentralised technologies such as blockchain, to ensure the opening of so-called ‘black box’, which prevents users from accessing the built-in algorithm that works like an engine to AI systems.

Google signals more moves to promote AI as a force for social good

A number of entities have engaged in promoting socially-conscious machine learning. Google has shown proactivity in taking AI operations into various sectors where automated systems can bring greater benefits The company is also entering promising partnerships with universities and the public sector to contribute its expertise to improve social services.

In a recent partnership with Harvard University, Google’s new AI system has been deployed to assess food safety records in restaurants in cities in the US via a machine learning model that scans online searches indicative of food poisoning, then looking up restaurants visited by the users who performed those searches. Lastly, for each applicable restaurant, it calculates the proportion of people who ate there and later showed evidence of foodborne illnesses in their searches.

In the UK, DeepMind, the tech lab powered by Google, and world leader hub in artificial intelligence research and its application for positive impact, is partnering with the NHS to improve service tools and analyse test results more quickly to ensure faster treatment.

After receiving strong public backlash due over a controversial military contract using AI, Google is now showing commitment to deploying its AI operations into positive impact projects.

“Careful ethical analysis can help us understand which potential uses of vision technology are inappropriate, harmful, or intrusive. And ethical decision-making practices can help us reason better about challenging dilemmas and complex value tradeoffs — such as whether to prioritise transparency or privacy in an AI application where providing more of one may mean less of the other,” wrote Rajen Sheth, director of product management for Cloud AI for Google.

In an initiative called ‘AI Impact Challenge’ Google is also providing $25million in funding via its non-profit arm, Google.org, to humanitarian projects that use Google’s machine learning technology, placing a particular interest in projects that further social and environmental good. The team is looking for practical, feasible and scalable solutions that address societal challenges, going beyond simple use-case scenarios to becoming an indispensable tool for social and environmental revolution.

In times of fast-paced tech advancements, innovation is key for the companies to keep themselves up-to-speed in this constantly regenerating market and offer cutting edge tools addressing use cases. Yet, as society grows more conscious and the consumer market demands ethically-committed companies, corporate responsibility becomes a priority and a mission.

“There is no doubt that Artificial Intelligence and Blockchain are the two most-discussed disruptive technologies in the last years, which are set to disrupt the tech and business paradigm in a big way over the next decade. In many ways, the two are conceptual opposites: AI, which reached its peak in 2016–2017, is very much centralised and closed; whereas blockchain, which boomed a year later, powers open-source decentralised systems, says Stefania Barbaglio director at Cassiopeia Services, leading PR agency in the blockchain space.

“However, the future is the intersection and integration of both. Their combined power is huge: maximising scalability security, transparency and decentralisation, and efficiency via fully decentralised AI marketplace networks, and decentralised autonomous organisations (DAO). A new paradigm is taking shape.“

This is a post on Cassiopeia’s AI series. Stay tuned for more insights into AI and Blockchain integration and positive social impact by disruptive technologies.

Malta: Europe’s new innovation hub

‘Artificial Intelligence has the potential to change not only basic concepts, such as work, but also life as we know it,’ said Prime Minister of Malta Joseph Muscat. Having already conquered a special position within the blockchain space, the Maltese government is now set on a mission to place Malta at the forefront of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Internet-of-Things (IoT).

Fintech investments have been steadily growing over recent years, and Malta positions itself to snap up a large share. More than bringing innovation to obsolete financial systems, the advent of the fintech industry is increasing value in services, placing user benefit at the core of each product and contributing to a more connected society.

Understanding the potential of new disruptive technologies, the small but ambitious island is becoming a hub for technology innovation by seeking partnerships and developing friendly regulation.

Looking to the future and welcoming AI into its economy has the potential to take Malta’s economy to the next level. AI is set to become of the main drivers of multisector economic growth, improving customer experience in financial services, manufacturing and entertainment, among other fields.

“Now that the Blockchain-related laws are in effect, and our vision of making Malta The Blockchain Island is materialising, we can start looking at new economic niches, finding ways to incorporate them into our ecosystem. We want Malta to become a powerhouse of economic innovation. In the case of Artificial Intelligence, we believe that this holds a lot of opportunities that will benefit the entire country,”’ said Malta’s Junior Minister Silvio Schembri.

One of the main hurdles preventing fintech from growing even further are outdated regulations. Malta therefore hopes to attract investment by setting up a fintech-friendly business environment. It has already put in place a regulatory framework for cryptocurrencies and blockchain activities, becoming one of the leading crypto nations in Europe, and now hopes to replicate this success within the AI and IoT spaces.

The Maltese AI strategy aims to identify opportunities and key stakeholders to integrate AI with a view to boosting the country’s digital economy. Furthermore, Malta is working to provide the education, expertise and infrastructure necessary to support AI developments.

The recent Malta Blockchain Summit has been one of the most important events in the crypto space. The Summit gathered over 8,000 delegates and the biggest names from the global blockchain community, including John McAfee, and co-founder of IOHK Charles Hoskinson.

Block Commodities Chairman Chris Cleverly, City AM Crypto Insider James Boawter and of IOHK Founder Charles Hoskinson. “There are quite a few smart people on the block-train and a few very big brains driving. Only one of them actually gets Africa is the place where Blockchain will FIRST make a meaningful difference and ACTUALLY goes there. Great to hang with him in Malta and my long-time buddy the crypto journo for CityAM.” commented Chris Cleverly on his Linkeldn

The Summit was organised with the support of the Maltese government, and according to local sources has already been confirmed again for 2019.

One of the conference highlights was the official announcement of Malta’s AI strategy by ‘Sophia’: a humanoid robot capable of interpreting and understanding human language, as well as 60 different human expressions.

Much like blockchain, the official incorporation of AI technology into the Maltese economy points towards great progress in diverse areas such as health, education, transportation and logistics.

Following the success of the Blockchain Summit and the launch of strategies on AI and IoT, Malta establishes itself as a leading innovation and fintech hub in Europe.

“There is no doubt that Artificial Intelligence and Blockchain are the two most-discussed disruptive technologies in the last years, which are set to disrupt the the tech and business paradigm in a big way over the next decade. In many ways, the two are conceptual opposites: AI, which reached its peak in 2016–2017, is very much centralised and closed; whereas blockchain, which boomed a year later, powers open-source decentralised systems. However, the future is the intersection and integration of both. Their combined power is huge: maximising scalability security, transparency and decentralisation, and efficiency via fully decentralised AI marketplace networks, and decentralised autonomous organisations (DAO). A new paradigm is taking shape.“ commented Stefania Barbaglio director at Cassiopeia Services, leading PR agency in the blockchain space.

Fintech: Boosting economies and markets in Europe

Fintech has created systems which are faster, cheaper and more convenient than their predecessors, challenging industries to innovate and improve their services and products. The merging of financial services and technology has birthed the fintech industry, one of the fastest-growing markets in recent years, which is not only improving financial services but also spurring economic growth and development in many parts of the world.

Fintech has been an unstoppable force over the last few years. So far in 2018, the market has already accumulated $41.7billion — up from $39.4bn in 2017, already a record year for fintech investment around the globe.

As tech startups gear up to reshape the future of finance, investors and venture capitalists move to join the movement. The impressive growth in fintech has led venture capitalists from all parts of the world to join the fintech boom and invest substantially in innovative projects, with investment in fintech companies up 41% over the last four years, according to PwC’s data.

“Innovation is disrupting financial services and opening up new opportunities and experiences to facilitate transactions and promote financial inclusion. The leading companies in fintech are those which develop technologies with strong use cases,” says Stefania Barbaglio.

Malta: Europe’s new innovation hub

‘Artificial Intelligence has the potential to change not only basic concepts, such as work, but also life as we know it,’ said Prime Minister of Malta Joseph Muscat. Having already conquered a special position within the blockchain space, the Maltese government is now set on a mission to place Malta at the forefront of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Internet-of-Things (IoT).

Fintech investments have been steadily growing over recent years, and Malta positions itself to snap up a large share. More than bringing innovation to obsolete financial systems, the advent of the fintech industry is increasing value in services, placing user benefit at the core of each product and contributing to a more connected society.

Understanding the potential of new disruptive technologies, the small but ambitious island is becoming a hub for technology innovation by seeking partnerships and developing friendly regulation.

Looking to the future and welcoming AI into its economy has the potential to take Malta’s economy to the next level. AI is set to become of the main drivers of multisector economic growth, improving customer experience in financial services, manufacturing and entertainment, among other fields.

“Now that the Blockchain-related laws are in effect, and our vision of making Malta The Blockchain Island is materialising, we can start looking at new economic niches, finding ways to incorporate them into our ecosystem. We want Malta to become a powerhouse of economic innovation. In the case of Artificial Intelligence, we believe that this holds a lot of opportunities that will benefit the entire country,”’ said Malta’s Junior Minister Silvio Schembri.

One of the main hurdles preventing fintech from growing even further are outdated regulations. Malta therefore hopes to attract investment by setting up a fintech-friendly business environment. It has already put in place a regulatory framework for cryptocurrencies and blockchain activities, becoming one of the leading crypto nations in Europe, and now hopes to replicate this success within the AI and IoT spaces.

The Maltese AI strategy aims to identify opportunities and key stakeholders to integrate AI with a view to boosting the country’s digital economy. Furthermore, Malta is working to provide the education, expertise and infrastructure necessary to support AI developments.

The recent Malta Blockchain Summit has been one of the most important events in the crypto space. The Summit gathered over 8,000 delegates and the biggest names from the global blockchain community, including John McAfee, and co-founder of IOHK Charles Hoskinson.

Block Commodities Chairman Chris Cleverly, City AM Crypto Insider James Boawter and of IOHK Founder Charles Hoskinson. “There are quite a few smart people on the block-train and a few very big brains driving. Only one of them actually gets Africa is the place where Blockchain will FIRST make a meaningful difference and ACTUALLY goes there. Great to hang with him in Malta and my long-time buddy the crypto journo for CityAM.” commented Chris Cleverly on his Linkeldn

The Summit was organised with the support of the Maltese government, and according to local sources has already been confirmed again for 2019.

One of the conference highlights was the official announcement of Malta’s AI strategy by ‘Sophia’: a humanoid robot capable of interpreting and understanding human language, as well as 60 different human expressions.

Much like blockchain, the official incorporation of AI technology into the Maltese economy points towards great progress in diverse areas such as health, education, transportation and logistics.

Following the success of the Blockchain Summit and the launch of strategies on AI and IoT, Malta establishes itself as a leading innovation and fintech hub in Europe.

“There is no doubt that Artificial Intelligence and Blockchain are the two most-discussed disruptive technologies in the last years, which are set to disrupt the the tech and business paradigm in a big way over the next decade. In many ways, the two are conceptual opposites: AI, which reached its peak in 2016–2017, is very much centralised and closed; whereas blockchain, which boomed a year later, powers open-source decentralised systems. However, the future is the intersection and integration of both. Their combined power is huge: maximising scalability security, transparency and decentralisation, and efficiency via fully decentralised AI marketplace networks, and decentralised autonomous organisations (DAO). A new paradigm is taking shape.“ commented Stefania Barbaglio director at Cassiopeia Services, leading PR agency in the blockchain space.

Fintech: Boosting economies and markets in Europe

Fintech has created systems which are faster, cheaper and more convenient than their predecessors, challenging industries to innovate and improve their services and products. The merging of financial services and technology has birthed the fintech industry, one of the fastest-growing markets in recent years, which is not only improving financial services but also spurring economic growth and development in many parts of the world.

Fintech has been an unstoppable force over the last few years. So far in 2018, the market has already accumulated $41.7billion — up from $39.4bn in 2017, already a record year for fintech investment around the globe.

As tech startups gear up to reshape the future of finance, investors and venture capitalists move to join the movement. The impressive growth in fintech has led venture capitalists from all parts of the world to join the fintech boom and invest substantially in innovative projects, with investment in fintech companies up 41% over the last four years, according to PwC’s data.

“Innovation is disrupting financial services and opening up new opportunities and experiences to facilitate transactions and promote financial inclusion. The leading companies in fintech are those which develop technologies with strong use cases,” says Stefania Barbaglio.

Gaming market is bigger than Hollywood, says Internet pioneer Bill Louden

In an exclusive interview for the FinancialFox TV Show, Bill Louden, internet pioneer and Non-Exec Director at London-listed Online Blockchain plc (OBC), commented about the company’s latest move into crypto gaming and ensures the future is bright for those in investing and working in this sector.

“It is a hundred billion-dollar industry, bigger than Hollywood; there’s huge scope for growth” that’s how Bill Louden defines the gaming market. Bill is a tech pioneer, having witnessed and been part of the advent of the internet, now bringing his expertise and knowledge to progress Online Blockchain (OBC).

Online Blockchain plc evolved from On-Line plc, one of the first tech companies to gain ground during the dot com boom — now exploring the opportunities arising from the blockchain revolution.

Two weeks ago, OBC announced it bought a 35% stake in the fast-growing US-based crypto development team Encryptid Gaming Inc. Encryptid is exploring the multiple elements of Ethereum blockchain and applying them to games to spice up the gaming experience.

Indeed, the market show favour for this investment: according to research from New Zoo, the global games market is set to reach $137.9 Billion in 2018 — an increase of 13% from 2017’s figures. Mobile gaming represents more than half of the entire market in 2018, following a decade of double-digit growth since the emergence of smartphones. Consumer spending on games is also expected to grow to $180.1 billion by 2021.

As it is characteristic of this disruptive technology, blockchain will enable a new generation of games to be more flexible, stimulating and, of course, profitable. “Gamers are comfortable with adopting cryptocurrencies and blockchain in practice”, says Bill, as they are already used to using digital currencies.

Like Bill Louden, OBC CEO Clem Chambers has long experience in tech innovation as well as games. “I have worked in and been at the forefront of the gaming world since the early 90s and seen many developments. The advent of blockchain technology opens up a new adventure and a multitude of possibilities. I am looking forward to this blockchain-enabled gaming future,” said Chambers in light of OBC investment in crypto gaming.

Encryptid employs Steam platform for its developments. Steam is a dominant digital platform in gaming and the largest digital distribution platform for PC gaming estimated to have 75% of the market space. By early 2018, the service had over 150 million registered accounts and is available in 26 languages.

The implementation of blockchain into gaming enhances user experience at many levels. Because of its decentralised nature, players can take companions and items to different worlds within the gaming universe, increasing participation, engagement and dynamics.

Kyle Stratis of Encryptid Gaming Inc. said that blockchain opens up opportunities and new experiences for gamers and that OBC is the right partner for it: “Not only are we building a universe, but we will be transforming gaming by leveraging the exciting possibilities of blockchain technology.”

Watch interview with Bill Louden here

Implementing blockchain into the supply chain: More ethics, sustainability and better consumer…

Implementing blockchain into the supply chain: More ethics, sustainability and better consumer protection

As the blockchain revolution keeps gathering momentum around the world, different industries are deploying the technology to challenge current ways of operating and improve standards.

One of these industries is the logistics sector, and its long, multi-layered supply chains. A supply chain encompasses many levels, ranging from manufacturing to consumer use and everything in between.

The current globalised manufacturing system implies that these typically complex supply chains actually surpass geographical boundaries, sometimes intercontinentally. This results in a lack of transparency in the current model. Consumers have limited knowledge and understanding of the manufacturing process, allowing for flaws and gaps to go unnoticed by the public eye.

The solution? Blockchain, of course.

Blockchain technology has the ability to store a huge amount of data on an open, secure and accurate platform. The key features of blockchain technology could help revolutionise supply chain technologies.

A decentralised digital ledger network can record, track, verify and share each and every element of all the assets in one single network, which is open to public access. It can pull together links all along the chain, from raw material providers right up to retailers. The records are kept in a digital central system, as opposed to leaving it up to each participant to store data in their own isolated system.

The case for blockchain in Fashion

Since all kinds of information can be included in a blockchain-powered supply chain, companies’ unethical practices can be recorded and exposed. The fashion industry, for example, which is loaded with cash and celebrity promotion, is also known for some complacency over human and labour rights abuse.

Open information means that the culture of sweatshops, child labour, exploitation and human rights breaches could be close to an end, as a result of increased accountability for brands engaging in and profiting from it.

On top of that, a blockchain-based system would mean that counterfeit products could be traced back to origin and reduce incidence of fraudulent products. To verify goods’ provenance, the blockchain system authenticates and validates their authenticity, or any diversion from its original destination.

The pharma industry is also said to be exploring aspects of this technology . Drug fraud is indeed a concern, with figures showing that 10 percent of all pharmaceutical products around the world are fake — number that can jump to 70 percent in some countries. Fraudulent pharmaceuticals set a dangerous health precedent, so the use of blockchain in this industry could not only be revolutionary, but life-saving.

In 2017, London-based designer Martine Jarlgaard partnered with blockchain company Provenance to track the journey of all material through the supply chain. Each garment in her collection had a digital token, containing location, content and timestamps presented to consumers. Provenance tracked alpaca fleece from the moment of shearing on the farm, through to spinning, knitting, and finishing in Martine Jarlgaard’s London studio.

Matthew Drinkwater, head of the Fashion Innovation Agency at London College of Fashion, who partnered with Martine to give life to the project, said that their goal was to increase consumers’ confidence: “What we’re looking to create is a new protocol and standard for giving consumers confidence in what they’re buying. The fact that this is blockchain-verified will mean it’s a product that they can believe in. That’s where there should be a movement towards, and as the technology evolves, we’ll see the final part of the process become even more transparent and visible for consumers.”

“Full transparency and traceability becomes a stamp of approval allowing consumers to make informed choices with no extra effort,” says Martine.

Blockchain in the food industry

Similarly, the food industry can also enjoy great benefits from blockchain-powered supply chains. Until recently, it had been incredibly difficult for consumers to be sure of the origin of their food, with few mechanisms in place to check on food companies’ practices.

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), one in 10 people fall ill from contaminated food every year. Food fraud is indeed a problem, and in many cases it arises from flaws with the supply network.

A blockchain-based supply chain had a positive impact on farmers and raw material producers, ensuring corporate responsibility from wealthy food retailers. It also benefits the Fairtrade culture, as it allows for price disclosure, enabling consumers to check for any exploitation of small-scale producers in favour of big company profits, verifying that Fairtrade standards have been respected.

The benefits of blockchain

Ø Transparency: all information available made public
Ø Greater Scalability: any number of participants can participate in the network
Ø Security: open system helps eliminate malpractices and irregularities

Blockchain can increase the efficiency and transparency of any supply chain, creating a positive impact at every step from manufacturing to delivery. It is important, though, that this information is available for consumers so that they are fully aware of the unethical practices that companies could be held to account over. Consumers ultimately have the upper hand in the market and can make informed choices about a brand or purchase.

The Online Ogre: Dealing with Trolling and Defamation on Social Media

Widespread adoption of social media has created blurred boundaries around online privacy. Nowadays, as a great deal of interpersonal communication takes place on the web, personal exposure in the form of social media interaction cannot easily be taken back if you have been less than careful with your words.

The internet is indeed full of trolls: those who purposely bully and offend other users online Despite this, we do not have an efficient range of easily accessible tools to tackle the challenge.

Under the principle of fairness, anyone who has been defamed has the right to reply to that claim in the same location and by the same means as the offender. However, everything happens all too quickly online and, as Warren Buffett said, “it takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it”.

Users who have been trolled or bullied on social media may experience it so negatively that they do not feel like resuming activity on social networks. This is the story of April, a young girl from England whose experience with social media platforms during her teenage years was not so pleasant, leading to her relationship with social media has been permanently damaged.

Cassiopeia: Can you share your experience with social media trolling?

April: Essentially, when I was younger, I had a Tumblr account where I posted about YouTubers etc. It was all fun, but I did have a fair following of about 20k.

When I was doing this, I had a large group of friends who all had about the same following — we’d meet up as much as we could at events and stuff, it was nice.

But essentially at some point it began going downhill. With Tumblr you can get anonymous messages, so all the time I’d receive messages about my size and my personality, being called fat and annoying etc. When I reflect now, I know those people were probably 14 themselves and just looking for something to do, but when I was 14 it did really affect me. I’d turn my anonymous section off, but then the hate would go to my partner at the time who I had met on the website (she also got hate in this same way).

I think the worst of it was, from what I remember, an entire account was created, to hate on me and my friends, with people sending anonymous messages about how much they hate us etc. Eventually we managed to get the blog deleted but more comments were made.

Also, I remember once I created a help blog where people who were receiving hate or horrible messages could talk and get advice — but this got hacked and the blog got plastered with messages from the hacker saying I was apparently ‘homophobic’ and used the ’n’ word. You can imagine how this went down — the messages I got were awful.

At the time, it felt horrible. I was left wondering — why? But in hindsight, I think maybe it was jealousy — young girls my age bitter about me having loads of followers or talking to their beloved YouTubers on a regular basis. I guess, now, I feel sorry for them and I hope they’ve grown up in the same way I have. I mean, at the time, the internet was still young.

C: When this happened to you, were the routes for resolution available to you clear?

A: When all this was going on, the internet was still young really, I guess some people would consider my generation the first to use the internet like this. The options weren’t really clear, I wasn’t sure what to do except turn off my anonymous settings. After I had done that, some of the hate did die down, but some of it just went straight to my friends’ blogs.

C: What options do you wish were available to you when this happened to you?

A: I wish I had known more about online hate in the first place — what it is and what it can do. It was a shock to me — bullying on my laptop? How does this happen? But essentially, if I could go back, I think a system, maybe as simple as a button on all social media to report hateful comments would be simple and I think anonymous chat sites especially should have something like this, as it’s easier to be horrible when you think there are no consequences. Maybe even a support network, where younger children feel safe to talk about their experiences, as sometimes it can be hard for children to talk to their parents.

C: What effect, if any, did this have on your day-to-day life?

A: I really wouldn’t say it had an explicit effect on my day to day life. I mean, it did make me think about my weight etc, but I consider myself lucky that I’m not a sensitive person and can take things such as this on the chin. I can’t imagine how those who are easily affected by what people say to them would feel.

C: Do you think that information presented online about someone can have an impact in the real world (for better or worse)?

A: Oh 100%!I honestly believe that what you put on social media can make or break you, in some extreme cases, things you ‘innocently’ say online can literally have you fired or a nice thing you post online can low-key make you famous (kids on Ellen being found through videos on Facebook etc).

C: Did this experience change your relationship with social media? How?

A: Yes. I’m a lot more careful about things I say on posts, if I wouldn’t say something in person, I won’t say it online and I think that is a good motto to have. Additionally, I don’t use Tumblr anymore and have strong privacy settings on everything, I only want my friends and approved people to see what I’m doing — I wouldn’t want to risk having trolls commenting ‘fat’ or ‘ugly’ on nice pictures of me at the beach etc.

Cassiopeia is running a series of case studies on the impacts of online interactions, trolling and defamation. We are keen to hear about personal stories as well as businesses cases. If you’d like to share your story with us and help us raise awareness of the issue, email us on info@cassiopeia-ltd.com