Reply from the Stars: New app to talk to your favourite celebrities

Innovative tech company Right of Reply announces the launch of Reply from the Stars, a communication platform deploying digital identity to allow widely followed individuals to communicate with specific members of their audience.

it’s important for celebrities to communicate regularly and continue to build their individual brand on a daily basis, but the tabloid culture has created problems around gossip and defamation leading many celebrities to back away from traditional media. Reply from the Stars aims to prevent defamation and libelous attacks by tabloid press, protecting celebrities’ reputation as well as their privacy. With this brand new platform, celebrities can communicate directly with their fan base in a fully verified and secured environment.

“One of the main problems with one-to-one communication online is trusting the identity of the person on the other side. With Right of Reply we have created a special technology to identify each user based on their social media and national IDs,” says Matteo Flora digital reputation expert. “After a user goes through our identification process, the platform will generate a token so the celebrity can be sure to be talking to their fan and not anyone else.”

The true value of the platform is in generating tokens that are assigned to each user. Each token will have a unique value that provides financial compensation for the celebrity, which can then, for example, be directed to charitable causes. The main purpose of the platform is to provide a new channel for influential figures to interact personally with their fan base whilst engaging in philanthropic activities.

Furthermore, the app ensures end-to-end encrypted messages which cannot be accessed by any third party to ensure maximum privacy and minimum exposure.

For the time being, ‘Reply from the Stars’ is being targeted at footballers, soap opera and stars. Who will be the first celebrities on Reply from The Stars app? Stay tuned to find out.

Right of Reply is developing a range of platforms designed to improve debate online and manage online reputation. Visit its page https://rightofreply.news

The price of online defamation: How protecting your online reputation is invaluable

The internet –social media in particular –represents an unprecedented open platform for communication and interaction. While individuals have gained greater scope to exercise their freedom of expression, the online space has also become the front line for the rise of criticism and offence. In the digital media age, the spread of information is wide-reaching and rapid, but one needs to bear in mind that the internet never forgets, so false claims made online can rarely be wiped out and as a result could cause untold damage to an individual’s reputation.

Defamation, also known as libel, is defined as a wrongful act constituting a false statement about an individual, whose reputation is damaged as a result. In cases involving businesses and companies, libel can have serious impact on performance and business indicators.

In the internet age, this is a problem requiring an urgent solution. During a round table hosted by Schillings Partners, a reputation management firm, 93% of attendees agreed that serious claims on the internet should be ignored.

“The instant nature of social media is certainly changing the face of defamation law,” said Ian Birdsey, a senior associate at Pinsent Masons, to the FT. “More and more people use social media to communicate, and often with people beyond their immediate social sphere. All this brings with it a number of challenges — and one of those would appear to be a rise in the number of defamation claims relating to derogatory online posts.”

Addressing the issues of libel and untrue statements, the Defamation Act 2013 came into force to strengthen protective measures for reputation against inappropriate claims. The Act raised the threshold of defamation from ‘substantial’ to ‘serious harm’, increasing the severity of the issue and the damage caused to the reputation of individual libel victims.

The Act has proved effective, as cases of libel have decreased in the UK. According to a research by Thomson Reuters, there were 49 reported defamation cases resulting in a court hearing in the UK over the year to the end of June 2017 , down from 86 three years ago.

Out of the total, 22 percent of the defendants were newspapers, down from 50 percent ten years ago. Despite the decrease, individual claims increased to 43 in 2017, up two on the year before, which perhaps signals that users are as yet unaware of the implications of false claims on social networks.

Paying the price: Costs of defamatory claims affects individuals and corporations

The indiscriminate use of social media can indeed be very expensive for users, who may consider their online behavior benign, but in reality negatively impact someone’s image with their opinion. Back in 2014, Sharon Smith, a fitness instructor, faced legal action by Joanne Walder after posting on her Facebook that Walder had been the perpetrator of acts of violence. Walder claimed more than £20,000 in damages.

A spokesman for Sharon Smith said to the Evening Standard at the time: “The message which prompted the case was only meant to be sent to a close friend. However, it ended up being posted to all her friends — clearly showing the potential pitfalls of Facebook.”

Earlier in April, US first lady Melania Trump won damages from Daily Mail after the paper made allegations that she had worked as an escort. After withdrawing the allegations and publishing an apology, Daily Mail settled the case for $3 million.

In another episode last year, Daily Mail columnist Katie Hopkins was ordered to pay £24,000 in damages to writer and food blogger Jack Monroe after Hopkins attacked her via Twitter.

“It’s been a horrible, stressful experience and I’m so relieved it’s over. There are six ringbinders full of hateful poisonous messages I received, and I’ve had to read and reread them in the course of all this. I’m so glad I’ll never have to read them again,” said Monroe to the Guardian.

The solution: Give subjects the right to reply to the claim

A platform which allows all participants in a story a space to defend themselves, provide their version of the facts and tell their truth would prove invaluable. It is important to guarantee right of reply in the same space so as to not lose relevance and time, which could further intensify any reputation damage.

Right of Reply has a new, innovative solution that empowers individuals to directly control their online reputation. The concept of ‘Right of Reply’ offers individuals the right to respond to any criticism made about them in the same place that the original criticism was published, through its suite of patented search, respond and publish tools.

“We recognise the value of online reputation management and addressing incorrect and defamatory content that can spread easily on the internet. The significant associated legal costs could be saved if there was a tool available to manage replies to erroneous content and statements. RoR has created a revolutionary solution and product for newspapers and online media to circumnavigate the risk of lawsuits by people mentioned in their content. Our aim is to create an online reputation ecosystem for individuals to manage their online reputations in a simple, direct, low-cost and effective way that empowers individuals and at the same time protects online media,” said Stefania Barbaglio, Right of Reply PR and UK Development.

To find out more about Right of Reply’s services, please visit the company website https://rightofreply.news

Right of Reply team will also be attending and presenting at the upcoming Cassiopeia Investor Symposium on the 21 November 2018.

For more information and to register: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/cassiopeia-investor-symposium-tickets-47398735895

Individual credit history

Beyond data credit scoring: Individual Financial Reputation

The Rise of ‘bad credit’ mortgages: complicated history leads to low score

Buying a house seems an impossibility for millions of people in the UK, studies have shown. Increasing property prices and untrustworthy credit score systems are positioning Britons further away from the goal of owning a property. The solution? A system that allows customers to explain their side of their credit histories, laying out the facts and circumstances behind the numbers.

In Britain, many worry about getting a mortgage, especially the millennial generation, which has witnessed house prices skyrocketing while wages have only stagnated. Given these conditions, hopeful buyers are finding themselves lacking in finance options.

Indeed, according to Moneyfacts, the number of bad credit mortgages in the UK has risen by 118 in the six months ending in September. Bad credit mortgages are schemes designed to help those with poor credit scores to buy property, currently representing 17% of the mortgage market. Those with very poor credit history will need a deposit of 35% to enter the programme.

These schemes, however, come with higher rates, putting the lender at increased risk. In September, Moneyfacts reported that the bad credit mortgage rate is currently at 4.52%, whereas the average rate of a two-year fixed rate mortgage is at 2.54%.

It is also worth bearing in mind that in the gig economy, income is rarely a fixed entity. Many workers are freelancers, or working on ‘zero-hour’ contracts. Research from Online Mortgage Advisor revealed that a third of respondents believe that having a zero-hour contract could be a barrier to securing a mortgage.

The current mood among hopeful house buyers is indeed pessimistic: nearly 13 million Britons don’t believe they would be able to get a mortgage.

The poll from Comparethemarket found that 45% of mortgage seekers who had their application denied said this had a negative impact on their credit score.

“You are right to be worried that your credit card debt could see you turned down for a mortgage,” said Virginia Walls, mortgage expert at the Guardian.

“You are also right that when you make a full mortgage application, you will face questions about your credit cards and may even have to show recent statements. You will also be asked detailed questions about other regular expenditure to help the lender decide whether you will be able to afford a mortgage on top of all your other financial commitments.”

Credit history is more than a number, it is about individual financial reputation and credibility.

Credit history is built on a variety of aspects, such as payment history, outstanding balances, length of credit history, and types of credit accounts. A lower credit score means that one is less able to secure a mortgage or a loan, as well as having to pay higher interest rates when credit is granted.

Individual Financial profiles are put together from black-and-white data, stark facts, with no subjective assessment. If an individual is in debt, with considerable outgoings and no family support, many forms of credit — including mortgages — may prove inaccessible. The same individual might also be facing divorce or serious illness, with all their associated costs. Savings may have been poured into education.

However, none of this background information is currently taken into account as mitigating circumstances by credit scorers. Although undeniably relevant to an individual’s financial situation, such circumstances do not ‘count’ in the final assessmen.

The root of the problem is in the system that builds an individual’s credit history. Personal finance and savings are fluid information, after all, people manage their wealth according to their priorities at any given time, so applying a figure to certify an individual’s credibility seems a shallow solution. It does not reflect wealth, which may have been accumulated in other forms than cash, or unforeseen circumstances over which one has no control.

Such a system often proves to be unfair for the average person and can do more harm than good when it comes to looking for financial support. We need a tool that allows this ‘human’ information to be implemented, a mechanism that will give individuals the opportunity to provide information beyond the figures on their credit histories. It is therefore right that consumers should be able to provide a personal take on the way they have managed their own finances, in order to be assessed more fairly.

Is it possible to have a more inclusive individual credit scoring with more accurate data to include individual’s opinion and truth?

Perceiving the need for a more holistic approach to credit ratings today, UK technology company Right of Reply is introducing its ‘Reply on Credit Check’ (RoCC) platform, which works alongside credit agencies to implement a layer of individual statement on credit history, and response to negative content.

“Right of Reply has developed a unique platform, ROCC, that offers specific services and tools to credit agencies and individuals aiming for a fairer credit scoring data and information. It allows a registered individual to amend their own credit report and credit rating with narrative information to correct errors or explain events in that credit report, and to contextualise or justify any debt position expressed in the credit report.

The credit agency will benefit from this corrected information as it will reduce their legal responsibilities, and because they will offer their client a more precise report that takes into account the point of view of the debtor.

We believe that individuals should have the opportunity to ‘tell their truth’ in response to any negative/inaccurate online content and any inaccurate Credit Report or Financial History that could be damaging for their reputation and personal lives.” commented Stefania Barbaglio, Right of Reply PR and UK Development.

Individual credit history

Beyond data credit scoring: Individual Financial Reputation

The Rise of ‘bad credit’ mortgages: complicated history leads to low score

Buying a house seems an impossibility for millions of people in the UK, studies have shown. Increasing property prices and untrustworthy credit score systems are positioning Britons further away from the goal of owning a property. The solution? A system that allows customers to explain their side of their credit histories, laying out the facts and circumstances behind the numbers.

In Britain, many worry about getting a mortgage, especially the millennial generation, which has witnessed house prices skyrocketing while wages have only stagnated. Given these conditions, hopeful buyers are finding themselves lacking in finance options.

Indeed, according to Moneyfacts, the number of bad credit mortgages in the UK has risen by 118 in the six months ending in September. Bad credit mortgages are schemes designed to help those with poor credit scores to buy property, currently representing 17% of the mortgage market. Those with very poor credit history will need a deposit of 35% to enter the programme.

These schemes, however, come with higher rates, putting the lender at increased risk. In September, Moneyfacts reported that the bad credit mortgage rate is currently at 4.52%, whereas the average rate of a two-year fixed rate mortgage is at 2.54%.

It is also worth bearing in mind that in the gig economy, income is rarely a fixed entity. Many workers are freelancers, or working on ‘zero-hour’ contracts. Research from Online Mortgage Advisor revealed that a third of respondents believe that having a zero-hour contract could be a barrier to securing a mortgage.

The current mood among hopeful house buyers is indeed pessimistic: nearly 13 million Britons don’t believe they would be able to get a mortgage.

The poll from Comparethemarket found that 45% of mortgage seekers who had their application denied said this had a negative impact on their credit score.

“You are right to be worried that your credit card debt could see you turned down for a mortgage,” said Virginia Walls, mortgage expert at the Guardian.

“You are also right that when you make a full mortgage application, you will face questions about your credit cards and may even have to show recent statements. You will also be asked detailed questions about other regular expenditure to help the lender decide whether you will be able to afford a mortgage on top of all your other financial commitments.”

Credit history is more than a number, it is about individual financial reputation and credibility.

Credit history is built on a variety of aspects, such as payment history, outstanding balances, length of credit history, and types of credit accounts. A lower credit score means that one is less able to secure a mortgage or a loan, as well as having to pay higher interest rates when credit is granted.

Individual Financial profiles are put together from black-and-white data, stark facts, with no subjective assessment. If an individual is in debt, with considerable outgoings and no family support, many forms of credit — including mortgages — may prove inaccessible. The same individual might also be facing divorce or serious illness, with all their associated costs. Savings may have been poured into education.

However, none of this background information is currently taken into account as mitigating circumstances by credit scorers. Although undeniably relevant to an individual’s financial situation, such circumstances do not ‘count’ in the final assessmen.

The root of the problem is in the system that builds an individual’s credit history. Personal finance and savings are fluid information, after all, people manage their wealth according to their priorities at any given time, so applying a figure to certify an individual’s credibility seems a shallow solution. It does not reflect wealth, which may have been accumulated in other forms than cash, or unforeseen circumstances over which one has no control.

Such a system often proves to be unfair for the average person and can do more harm than good when it comes to looking for financial support. We need a tool that allows this ‘human’ information to be implemented, a mechanism that will give individuals the opportunity to provide information beyond the figures on their credit histories. It is therefore right that consumers should be able to provide a personal take on the way they have managed their own finances, in order to be assessed more fairly.

Is it possible to have a more inclusive individual credit scoring with more accurate data to include individual’s opinion and truth?

Perceiving the need for a more holistic approach to credit ratings today, UK technology company Right of Reply is introducing its ‘Reply on Credit Check’ (RoCC) platform, which works alongside credit agencies to implement a layer of individual statement on credit history, and response to negative content.

“Right of Reply has developed a unique platform, ROCC, that offers specific services and tools to credit agencies and individuals aiming for a fairer credit scoring data and information. It allows a registered individual to amend their own credit report and credit rating with narrative information to correct errors or explain events in that credit report, and to contextualise or justify any debt position expressed in the credit report.

The credit agency will benefit from this corrected information as it will reduce their legal responsibilities, and because they will offer their client a more precise report that takes into account the point of view of the debtor.

We believe that individuals should have the opportunity to ‘tell their truth’ in response to any negative/inaccurate online content and any inaccurate Credit Report or Financial History that could be damaging for their reputation and personal lives.” commented Stefania Barbaglio, Right of Reply PR and UK Development.

Blockchain to create a better internet: Digital Reputation expert Matteo Flora discusses how…

Blockchain to create a better internet: Digital Reputation expert Matteo Flora discusses how disruptive technologies can create a fairer online world

‘Thanks to Blockchain and AI, people can directly manage their digital identity and online reputation. This is game-changing and hugely powerful’

In the latest episode of FinancialFox, the well-known Italian digital activist and reputation expert Matteo Flora talked about digital identity and the challenges in managing our online reputations. Matteo is the founder of The Fool, a leading ORM company in Italy; and part of the founding team of Right of Reply (RoR), the fast-growing UK-based technology company boasting a cutting-edge blockchain-powered online reputation management platform with AI integration.

At the moment, users do not make use of many tools to respond to online content, due to the fast pace at which social media moves. As a result, people’s reputations are affected, often negatively and permanently.

Matteo is driven by the desire to democratise the right of reply ‒ a legal right in many countries ‒ to ensure that every individual can provide their own version of the story, helping build a fairer internet.

In his new venture, the start-up Right of Reply (RoR), Matteo is helping develop effective solutions to these problems. RoR’s cutting-edge applications are powered by blockchain and AI technology, both of which represent the latest digital revolution.

‘Thanks to Blockchain and AI, people can directly manage their digital identity and online reputation. This is game-changing and hugely powerful,’ he says. ‘RoR places an overlaying reputation layer upon the internet, newspapers and social media, so the comment is embedded in the article posts and can be seen by everyone.’

RoR is the first solution of its kind, creating a space for fair debate where participants in a story can provide their versions simultaneously, in the same online space and with same relevance: ‘RoR will be fully developed and widespread in a couple of years, then people around the world will have the means to access information that right now only VIPs paying huge amounts of money can get. It gives everyone the possibility to reply to online content.’

Matteo Flora talks to Crypto Guru Stefania Barbaglio on FinanciaFox

RoR’s platform is unique because it will offer a new tool to improve the quality of content that is already available: ‘Right now, Google deals with all the information we find online. But there is no way to integrate the users’ opinions. They are different missions: Google wants to retrieve information, whereas RoR wants everyone to be able to respond to this information — indeed, exercise their right of reply. Google is only dealing with content; we are dealing with the underlying stories behind that content,’ says Matteo.

Matteo believes that the boundaries between fake news and opinion are very blurred, nd that the solution to such a complex issue is to allow all participants in a story to give their respective versions. Platforms like RoR can be effective in the fight against fake news because they show how different sides of a story all contribute to one truth. ‘We are not able to draw a line between fake news and opinion, but what we can do is show both sides to a story, giving more detailed information about that story.’

Right of Reply (RoR) offer disruptive ORM tools. It deploys decentralised blockchain/AI-powered-systems to help people and enterprises manage their online reputations. RoR platforms, which will soon be released to users, has an important role in and contributes to supporting social justice by maintaining free press and fair media by providing management tools for online and real-world reputations. RoR is currently developing on 3 products for regulated media, online newspapers and magazines; credit agencies; and social media (RoR; RoCC and RoRKey respectively).

The pilot project will soon start in Italy. STAY TUNE

If you want to know more, contact stefania@cassiopeia-ltd.com

Exponential Technologies: Exploring the potential of tech companies to change the world

In the latest episode of the FinancialFox Podcast, Blockchain PR expert Stefania Barbaglio talked to David Orban, a visionary entrepreneur who sees our society as a product of the technological advancements mankind has witnessed so far.

David is a fierce advocate of exponential technologies: those that increase their power every couple of years and rapidly evolve. The power lies in leveraging on existing technologies to create better, more sophisticated ones. These changes, according to David, improve the lives of everyone around the world.

David has spent most of his life looking at innovative technologies and extrapolating their power to cause positive change. He believes companies harnessing evolving technologies shape our interactions with one another and, ultimately, our future.

David founded Network Society Ventures (NSV), a diversified global firm which is active in high technology investment, consulting and operations. The company helps its clients to understand exponentially changing technologies, the power of networks, distributed/decentralised organisations and their impacts on the clients themselves and the world at large.

“We are migrating from hierarchical centralised structures to decentralised ones that are going to push power to the edges. NSV looks at how businesses and society overall is addressing this transformation. Companies working with the Internet of Things, blockchain technology and artificial intelligence, for example… These companies have the power to lay ground for the decade of technological and social growth,” says David.

These advancements are not only taking place within information technology, but extending to all sectors — healthcare, food chain, finance and management, among others.

David has recently joined Right of Reply (RoR), a blockchain-powered project which will deploy decentralised systems to help people and companies manage their online reputation.

David highlights that, in order to be part of this hyper-connected society, individuals have had to give up on their privacy and freedom, and it is time to claim this right back. RoR is deploying the latest technological advancements to protect the most important asset we have: our identities.

The exponential growth potential of RoR is its creation of a much-needed solution to fight bad actors and untrue content online, harnessing on blockhain structures to do so: “RoR chose architects that will work on the next generation of technological platforms as they mature and become available.”

RoR platforms, which will soon be released and available for users, has an important role in and contributes to supporting social justice by maintaining free press and fair media by providing management tools for online and real-world reputations.

“Decentralised technologies will continue to evolve and allow people to design better lives for themselves and create societal structures that benefit them,” believes David.

Technology for positive change. That’s what it is all about.

LISTEN HERE to the full FinancialFox Podcast:

https://soundcloud.com/cassiopeia-services-plc/financialfox-exponential-technologies-driving-human-evolution-david-orban

Fake News: Fighting false claims in the era of free information

Since being named word of the year in 2017, ‘fake news’ has never been out of the spotlight. More than simply being false claims, fake news can have serious devastating effects. In an era of infinite information, how can we tell what is true and what isn’t?

There is no doubt that the emergence of social media has paved the way to a new era of human interaction, making the constraints of time and space things of the past and allowing people to interact with one another more openly.

In today’s word, with the widespread use of social media and technology applications, the main challenge is data and digital identity security. A few fintech companies have been focusing on new solutions to empower individuals and enterprises to protect themselves. Right of Reply is one of them.

Soon to be listed on the NASDAQ stock exchange, RoR is developing a blockchain-powered platform that allows individuals to first verify their data and create a reputation identity, then use this identity to reply as soon as possible and with equal effect to any damaging or incorrect content online.

Stefania Barbaglio, from Right of Reply, believes new technologies such as blockchain can help counter the effects of fake claims and defamation online: “Thanks to blockchain, we can now directly address the problem of online reputation management and fake news. There is no need for third parties to defend or act as guarantor or solution provider anymore, as any individual and enterprise has the opportunity and the power of action. This is revolutionary.”

It is widely recognised that our new communication technology is not always used for good. While it has brought people closer, it has also allowed the rise of fake news, the products of malicious actors who identified in the virtual world the distance and stealth necessary to act in their own interests to purposely harm an individual, an organisation, or even a decision maker.

Fake news is not a straightforward issue; there is a multitude of reasons that could motivate someone to start a fake rumour. Fake news can take many forms, from some apparently innocent gossip, to being used as a political tool. In many cases, they are pushed by ‘bot’ users, which were created to target and negatively influence the online presence of other users.

Research from Indiana University Network Science Institute indicates that between 9 to 15% of active Twitter accounts are social bots. This means that it’s very likely that less than 90% of current social media users are humans.

“The increase in claims arising from content on social media and websites reflects the growing impact and importance of new media compared with traditional news providers,” said Keith Mathieson, head of media at City law firm RPC. “The increase in actions over internet-based communications is a reflection of people’s concerns about their online reputations and the ease with which damaging information about individuals and businesses can be shared and spread,” he added to the Guardian.

In fact, with more than 3 billion users worldwide, social media platforms are increasingly more concerned about their role in the fake news industry — and how to fight it.

During the first half of this year, in attempts to take action to fight misinformation and fake news, Twitter did a massive ‘clean out’ of fake profiles and bots users across its network and reduced malicious activity, which resulted in tens of millions of accounts being deleted.

“Our digital ecosystem is being polluted by a growing number of fake user accounts, so Twitter’s commitment to cleaning up the digital space should be welcomed wholeheartedly by everyone, from users of the platforms, to creators and advertisers. We’ve focused most of our efforts on removing content against our terms, instead of building a systemic framework to help encourage more healthy debate, conversations, and critical thinking. This is the approach we need now.” said Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, in light of the clean-outs.

Twitter has not been the only platform to implement actions of this nature. WhatsApp, the instant message app now owned by Facebook, has limited the number of messages users can forward, to avoid spam and spreading of fake news.

The truth is that despite efforts by tech companies to check up on their users and manage their content, malicious actors evolve quickly and show a high level of proficiency in bettering their tactics. Policy changes and calls for regulatory actions are indeed vital in tackling such a complex, multi-layered issue.

If technology spurred the growth fake news, we should also be able to use technology to fight it.

The Online Ogre: Dealing with Trolling and Defamation on Social Media

Widespread adoption of social media has created blurred boundaries around online privacy. Nowadays, as a great deal of interpersonal communication takes place on the web, personal exposure in the form of social media interaction cannot easily be taken back if you have been less than careful with your words.

The internet is indeed full of trolls: those who purposely bully and offend other users online Despite this, we do not have an efficient range of easily accessible tools to tackle the challenge.

Under the principle of fairness, anyone who has been defamed has the right to reply to that claim in the same location and by the same means as the offender. However, everything happens all too quickly online and, as Warren Buffett said, “it takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it”.

Users who have been trolled or bullied on social media may experience it so negatively that they do not feel like resuming activity on social networks. This is the story of April, a young girl from England whose experience with social media platforms during her teenage years was not so pleasant, leading to her relationship with social media has been permanently damaged.

Cassiopeia: Can you share your experience with social media trolling?

April: Essentially, when I was younger, I had a Tumblr account where I posted about YouTubers etc. It was all fun, but I did have a fair following of about 20k.

When I was doing this, I had a large group of friends who all had about the same following — we’d meet up as much as we could at events and stuff, it was nice.

But essentially at some point it began going downhill. With Tumblr you can get anonymous messages, so all the time I’d receive messages about my size and my personality, being called fat and annoying etc. When I reflect now, I know those people were probably 14 themselves and just looking for something to do, but when I was 14 it did really affect me. I’d turn my anonymous section off, but then the hate would go to my partner at the time who I had met on the website (she also got hate in this same way).

I think the worst of it was, from what I remember, an entire account was created, to hate on me and my friends, with people sending anonymous messages about how much they hate us etc. Eventually we managed to get the blog deleted but more comments were made.

Also, I remember once I created a help blog where people who were receiving hate or horrible messages could talk and get advice — but this got hacked and the blog got plastered with messages from the hacker saying I was apparently ‘homophobic’ and used the ’n’ word. You can imagine how this went down — the messages I got were awful.

At the time, it felt horrible. I was left wondering — why? But in hindsight, I think maybe it was jealousy — young girls my age bitter about me having loads of followers or talking to their beloved YouTubers on a regular basis. I guess, now, I feel sorry for them and I hope they’ve grown up in the same way I have. I mean, at the time, the internet was still young.

C: When this happened to you, were the routes for resolution available to you clear?

A: When all this was going on, the internet was still young really, I guess some people would consider my generation the first to use the internet like this. The options weren’t really clear, I wasn’t sure what to do except turn off my anonymous settings. After I had done that, some of the hate did die down, but some of it just went straight to my friends’ blogs.

C: What options do you wish were available to you when this happened to you?

A: I wish I had known more about online hate in the first place — what it is and what it can do. It was a shock to me — bullying on my laptop? How does this happen? But essentially, if I could go back, I think a system, maybe as simple as a button on all social media to report hateful comments would be simple and I think anonymous chat sites especially should have something like this, as it’s easier to be horrible when you think there are no consequences. Maybe even a support network, where younger children feel safe to talk about their experiences, as sometimes it can be hard for children to talk to their parents.

C: What effect, if any, did this have on your day-to-day life?

A: I really wouldn’t say it had an explicit effect on my day to day life. I mean, it did make me think about my weight etc, but I consider myself lucky that I’m not a sensitive person and can take things such as this on the chin. I can’t imagine how those who are easily affected by what people say to them would feel.

C: Do you think that information presented online about someone can have an impact in the real world (for better or worse)?

A: Oh 100%!I honestly believe that what you put on social media can make or break you, in some extreme cases, things you ‘innocently’ say online can literally have you fired or a nice thing you post online can low-key make you famous (kids on Ellen being found through videos on Facebook etc).

C: Did this experience change your relationship with social media? How?

A: Yes. I’m a lot more careful about things I say on posts, if I wouldn’t say something in person, I won’t say it online and I think that is a good motto to have. Additionally, I don’t use Tumblr anymore and have strong privacy settings on everything, I only want my friends and approved people to see what I’m doing — I wouldn’t want to risk having trolls commenting ‘fat’ or ‘ugly’ on nice pictures of me at the beach etc.

Cassiopeia is running a series of case studies on the impacts of online interactions, trolling and defamation. We are keen to hear about personal stories as well as businesses cases. If you’d like to share your story with us and help us raise awareness of the issue, email us on info@cassiopeia-ltd.com

Online Reputation Management is on the top list in today hyper connected world

Online presence is practically mandatory these days, for corporations and individuals alike. The complexity of building and preserving an online profile in the wilds of modern social media, as well as the need to manage online reputation, have prompted the surge of a new and fast growing tech market: online reputation management.
As building a reliable and authentic online presence is challenging, time consuming and potentially expensive, corporations and institutions are now also waking up to the importance of protecting their online image. According to Deloitte Global Risk Report, reputation damage is the number one risk concern of business executives across the world — rightly so, as research from Bright Local revealed that 85% of consumers trust online businesses reviews as much as personal recommendations, thus highlighting the urgency with which companies need to act to maintain their online integrity. The need for innovative and effective tools to track and manage online profiles has spurred the growth of an entire industry, called Online Reputation Management (ORM). ORM services are used to positively influence consumers’ perceptions about a product, company, brand or other entity in online media. The relatively young ORM market is indeed growing fast. Consulting firm BIA/ Kelsey estimates that small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in North America spend up to $700m annually on online reputation management tools. “Executives can spend long years developing a strong brand. It can be beyond unsettling to wake up one day and see defamatory remarks appearing online, particularly when the items move beyond constructive criticism to include outrageous accusations and even slanderous or libelous remarks,” said Don Sorensen, president of Big Blue Robot, in an interview to Forbes. One of the main reasons behind this exponential growth of ORM services is the barriers users face when attempting to remove online data. In a Reputation Awareness report, 88% of respondents said that they find it difficult to remove inaccurate information from the internet. On top of that, studies indicate that the dissemination of negative news is a lot more rapid than positive news. Authorities have also felt the pressure to put regulations in place to address and prevent online misconduct. In 2015, the European Commission enacted the “Right to Be Forgotten” law which resulted in millions of pages being deleted from online search engines over the allegations that online results could damage people’s life. Despite efforts from central bodies, private ventures and start-ups are the ones really striving to solve and prevent issues, in particular initiatives deploying the latest technologies to build a stronger, more effective response mechanism. Investment Opportunity: Right of Reply (RoR)
Based in London, with a global network and footprint, Right of Reply (RoR) was born to allow everyone to respond personally and directly in a specific, unequivocal and timely manner to any online content that may affect his/her reputation. RoR is an innovative Social Impact Technology company providing rapid, low-cost, and legally sound solutions, to both individuals and enterprises to manage their reputations. Through its online platforms, RoR ensures anyone’s ability to counter unfair, inaccurate or erroneous content with timeliness and relevance, as well as offering media outlets protection against defamatory lawsuits and preventing spread of fake news. One of the main current challenge is that search engines evolve faster than the tools available on the ORM market. Exploring the use of innovative blockchain technology, RoR is inserting a modern take on the ‘Right of Reply’ — a right granted by British Common Law, to guarantee speed and accuracy. Under the principle of fairness, anyone who has been defamed has the right to reply to that claim in the same location and by the same means as the offender. In the online world, the medium is the “post” and the reply should therefore have the same timeliness and weight as the original post. RoR’s platform works by verifying the identity of the person cited in the original post and reserving a response position for that person, which is pinned to the original post. The blockchain ledger is permanently affixed to the response so that any future changes in the ledger will result in another alert on the ROR profile page of the cited person. Right of Reply has today reported its Audited Results for the period ended June 2018 which show a strong performance during the first half of the year 2018. “I am pleased to report initial positive results. Although they only refer to our first six months of operations, they bode well for the Company’s future as we are establishing RoR as a leading ground-breaking company operating in the online reputation management field, a market with high growth potential. We believe in the importance truth plays in maintaining a free and fair press, so have developed our unique set of management tools for online and real-world reputations,” commented CEO Tom Brooks Right of Reply is preparing for a public Listing. For more information feel free to get in touch with us at: info@cassiopeia-ltd.com

How a Blockchain powered platform could help to resolve the problem of online reputation management…

How a Blockchain powered platform could help to resolve the problem of online reputation management in a simpler and straightforward manner

Right of Reply and its unique blockchain powered servise RoRKey.
First of all, all starts from the KYC process. It is essential to ensure that only the subject of the article responds to any specific content related to his/her person. Our platform uses white label system apps — common to all our businness solutions — to underpin the blockchain infrastructure, which acts as a managing and identification system for digital identities.” says Right of Reply. Digital identities can be certified by KYC processes carried out by institutional third parties and authorities, complying with international standards. “Our users’ data will be stored in an identity wallet (I-Wallet) within the RoR App on their smartphone/tablets/computer, thus offering unparalleled security compared with storage on a central repository such as Facebook or Twitter” The I Wallet will be accessible through a self-generated identification number from a public key, and a corresponding private key. Users will then ask for certificates from relevant authorities, using KYC procedures. The definition of the standard to be used for saving the workflow in the blockchain is under development. This will significantly advance the offer of an open system linked to reputational issues Right of Reply operates via its current 3 business solutions for both individuals and enterprises: • RoR: Right to Reply to Regulated content • RoCC: Right to Reply to credit check and reports • RoRKey: Right to Reply to any other form of online content Based on the fact that it addresses counterparts such as editors of any media, who currently do not use blockchain technology in writing their content, RoR service is structured on a proven bur traditional technology.
RoCC service, which is confined by the same circumstances mentioned above, is aimed at credit agencies. Their platform offers the possibility to interact through a blockchain protocol in the event of their institutional counterparts, wi be ready to adopting similar protocols in both, formation and publication of their content. Blockchain technology and DLT allow consensus to be reached in a peer-to-peer network without having to trust a central authority, creating a trustless system where records of data are signed, verified and sealed in a decentralised way. Blockchain protocols will be used for RoRKey service offer, as well as to establishing the transactions workflow, resulting in a viable and secure solution for the management of public and private keys. Using the Right of Reply app as an identity wallet on the user’s smartphone, people can interact with the RoRKey application built on Ethereum’s blockchain.
Through a decentralised application (Dapp) RoRKey allows both every user to record the hash of any content on the blockchain and ultimately the content itself on the IPFS protocol, creating an open and decentralised registry for online reputation.
This Dapp doesn’t require people to trust RoRKey itself, because the company is merely a technical facilitator, a service provider between users and the blockchain decentralised application (Dapp). In this model, digital tokens are the economic incentive for creating and sustaining an ecosystem built around the RoRKey service. “Tokens are used to reward users and content creators for their collaboration, as well as to correspond Community arbitration services. RoRKey token is the key enabler to encourage fair communication on social networks and blogs, potentially addressing to the roots the problem of fake news currently threatening corporations like Facebook and other important players in the industry” says Right of Reply. See more on RORKEY at http://www.rorkey.com/