Life as a cyborg: Discovering a new reality with artificial senses

Technology is an all-pervasive phenomenon in today’s modern world, and we, as a society, are under its clutches. Since the late 1970s, continuous efforts are being made to come up with innovations in the field of technology that can aid in human functioning. Terms like machine learning and artificial intelligence have become the key jargon of contemporary times, having a huge influence on social evolution and challenge our imagination with ideas that once seemed impossible. One such phenomenon is cyborg art or cyborgism, which has become a reality among us.

The origin of the term ‘cyborg’, which is a shortened version of ‘cybernetic organism’, can be traced back to 1960 when Manfred Clynes and Nathan S Kline coined it. It denotes any organism having body parts that are both organic and biomechatronic. The cyborg art movement is one where the artists express themselves through the creation of new senses or extending their senses beyond the human physical boundaries by merging cybernetics with their own organism. By virtue of this artwork taking place inside the body of the cyborg artist, they are the only audience of their art.

The exponential growth of technologies integrated into human bodies is evident when just last month the technological mastermind, Elon Musk, disclosed the first details of an electronic brain implant developed by his company Neuralink, ‘to facilitate direct communications between people and machines.’

To get more insight into this subject, on the latest Cyborg Special episode on Financial Fox, host & presenter Stefania Barbaglio engages in a conversation with Barcelona based perceptual artist, Manel Muñoz, who is best known for developing and installing in his own body a cybernetic sensory organ that allows him to perceive the atmospheric changes from his surroundings. Manel Munoz talks about what inspired him to become a cyborg and an unusual way of feeling things around you and perceiving reality.

Muñoz explains how the process of understanding the relationship between the inputs received from the barometric organ and the actual weather conditions needs continuous learning over time, and for that reason, he calls these acquired senses as ‘artificial senses.’

Artificial senses are quite different than artificial intelligence, but they share the root of in-building technology into a process that is primarily human. The Neil Harbisson and Moon Ribas led Cyborg Foundation created in 2010 clarifies the difference between Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Artificial Senses (AS) in a simpler way, saying that the artificial senses happen when technology gathers the stimuli but the human creates the intelligence- as opposed to Artificial Intelligence where the machine itself creates the intelligence.

Cyborg Munoz says he can feel changes in the weather because of his artificial senses: ‘If the organ was giving me the weather forecast, this would be artificial intelligence, because I don’t need to think about what the forecast will be. But, in my case, I am using or I am having artificial sense because this is giving me like a new input that, maybe with experience, I will learn how the atmospheric pressure works and I will be able to learn and predict the weather,’

Harbisson and Ribas further explain how by designing new senses, our experience of reality becomes much deeper as it is through our senses itself that we perceive the world. That is why the Cyborg Foundation aims for Revealed Reality, and not Virtual Reality or Augmented Reality.

Unlike virtual reality, where things and scenarios are a projection and represent an unreal situation, revealed reality encompasses the perception of new dimensions and flows of energy that co-exist in our reality.

Thus, what the cybernetic organs and senses do is they help the cyborg artists in grasping an already existent reality around humans that is otherwise not possible to perceive because of the limitations of the biological body.

Applying this to his own case, Muñoz explains, ‘I am not inventing this atmospheric pressure around me. That already exists around me. But before having this new organ, I wasn’t able to perceive it in this way. So, I am just augmenting the boundaries of my body to be able to perceive more things that are already happening me. I am just reviewing my reality through this organ. Over time, I will be able to better interpret the inputs from my organs and ultimately fully develop a new sense. It is a learning progress also for me. Technology is helping me, it is not giving me answers.’

With technology growing through such massive leaps and bounds, and human beings getting increasingly attached to the idea of connecting everything to the internet, we can only sit back and wait to see what more the future has in store for us.

Follow us on @Cassiopeia_ltd and @_FinancialFox for more intriguing interviews. Stay tuned!

Malta AI and Blockchain Summit: Connecting passionate innovators with cutting edge technology

Among the thousands of conferences and gatherings happening in the blockchain space, it can be a difficult task to find the right place to be for you to be. The Malta AI & Blockchain Summit (AIBC) is the place for those looking for the best connections and the great opportunities to learn about the latest developments of innovative technologies.

Considered one of the flagship Blockchain events, the Malta AI and Blockchain Summit brings together the most important names in the industry and showcases the state-of-the-art technology. The Summit is a bi-annual expo, covering topics relating to the global sectors for Blockchain, AI, Big Data, IoT, and Quantum technologies.

The third edition is to take place on 7th and 8th of November in St. Julian’s, Malta and is expected to have more than 10,000 global attendees, a great leap from its first edition in November 2018 which counted with 8,000 guests.

Some of the previous high profile and key note speakers include AI VIP Sophia the Robot, the world’s first robot citizen and John McAfee, the famous British-American computer programmer and businessman.

With the dynamism of the new technologies and innovations coming into play, the Malta AIBC summit promises to deliver on the ideals of blockchain, AI, quantum technology, big data and the internet of things. It creates an ideal environment and the perfect opportunity for investors, innovators and aspiring leaders to come together and help empower people.

In addition to the Spring and Winter main events, the Malta AIBC also offers opportunities through a number of global satellite events and networking gatherings, as well as producing a bi-annual publication and news site with in-depth interviews and related content, bringing brand exposure and visibility to companies and an educational peg for enthusiasts and new comers to the industry.

Malta has become the hub for innovation in Europe, earning the reputation of ‘the Blockchain Island’. The Maltese government is very forward thinking and keen on promoting technology developments on national level to spur economic growth. The authorities are deeply involved in the making and presenting of the summit and they use the summit’s international attention to showcase their blockchain-friendly regulations, as seen with the three new government bills introduced by Malta’s prime minister and Secretary for Financial Services at the 2018 Summit.

More than attracting foreign investment and human capital, the summit serves as a platform for the Maltese government to renew its commitment to the future of the technology sector in Malta, possibly with the announcement of further regulations on the matter. The purpose is to grab a slice of an emerging market, and create an environment where cryptocurrencies can be used and traded with security under the regulatory framework.

Stefania Barbaglio, Blockchain strategist and Director at Cassiopeia Services believes Malta is a great example of successful strategy for business and investment and positive regulations: “Malta has become a role model for European nations, highlighting the role of positive legislation to boost economy and business activity. Outdated regulations and closed attitudes towards innovation can lead to elite nations losing their spot in the international investment scene. It is important that new regulations are centered around innovation and the social value of technology, so that the digital economies can flourish and develop.”

The passing of the recent laws makes Malta the pioneer nation in Europe to offer a holistic regulatory framework for Distributed Ledger Technology operations. Unlike their counterparts, Malta attempts to develop a comprehensive framework that comprises use and trade if digital currencies, ICOs, exchanges activity.

The strategy was developed by the Malta Digital Innovation Authority, who was also responsible for other three regulatory laws — the Innovative Technology Arrangements and Services (ITAS) Law, the Malta Digital Innovation Authority Law, and the Virtual Financial Assets (VFL) Law — that today form the cornerstones of DLT regulation in Malta and are designed to offer guidelines for companies entering the emerging sector.

The innovative mindset of the Maltese government is also reflected other economic sectors, from personal healthcare to financial technology. Because of that, Malta has been the European gateway for many policies, including the legalisation of medicinal cannabis and embracing crypto and gaming projects.

In March 2018, Malta officially legalised medical cannabis. A month later, with the Production of Cannabis for Medicinal and Research Purposes Act in place, Maltese entities were able to cultivate, import, process and produce cannabis intended for medical and research purposes under a controlled and supervised environment.

These policies led to the Malta Medicines Authority gaining international reputation and prestige for its patient-centric work in the regulation of medicines. The strategy seems to be working so far: according to statistics from Eurostat, a 75% share of the population in Malta perceived their health as good or very good.

It’s not surprising to acknowledge how Malta has become the centre and a pivotal point for all of Europe as it is a preferred homeland for many leading and innovative technology companies throughout the world. More exciting news can be expected at the Winter edition of the Malta AIBC Summit. You can purchase your tickets for the winter edition summit to be held on 7–8 of November 2019 at the hotel Intercontinental in St Julian’s here.

Cassiopeia Data Series: Intersection of Data and Disruptive Technologies

In this Information Age, data has become one of the most valuable assets in society. Data is defined as pieces of information collected to be examined and considered, and used to help decision-making; or information in an electronic form that can be stored and used by a computer.

The Global Big Data market is expected to reach $118.52 billion by 2022, growing at an impressive rate of 26.0% from 2015 to 2022, which includes the aggregated value of data in different products and services. The main factors driving this trend upwards are growth in consumer data, superior information security, and enhanced business efficiencies.

The data market is vast and full of opportunities, especially for those developing and curating technology. The total number of data workers in the 28 EU countries is estimated at 6.1 million, a figure that could almost double by the year 2020 if growth keeps on at this pace. On top of this, the number of organisations producing and supplying data-related products and services could reach almost 350,000 in 2020, when the number of data users could be more than 1.3 million.

Data is a concept society is still trying to grasp, and the questions around its uses are numerous and complex — concerning data ownership, privacy and surveillance, among others. Data requires careful and ethical management, as once information is made available online, it rarely gets deleted, making it difficult to measure the consequences of misuse.

“You can’t make a data set disappear. Once you post it, and people download it, it exists on hard drives all over the world,” says researcher Adam Harvey, whose project Megapixels documented the details of dozens of data sets and how they are being used, to the FT.

It is important to note that data in itself has no beneficial or damaging features. What defines it are the applications and purposes which it serves. As disruptive technologies continue to evolve and digitisation becomes more widespread, the uses of data become increasingly more diverse.

A PwC study has identified the top eight disruptive technologies of today, which are the flagships of the Fourth Industrial Revolution and can dramatically change the way we do business: Artificial Intelligence (AI), Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality, Blockchain, Internet of Things (IoT), Drones, 3D Printing and Robotics.

These are the core technologies that will matter most for business, across every industry, over the years to come. A stronger way to harness those technologies would be combining them to yield powerful applications that are even more beneficial and efficient.

From PwC, The Essential Eight

Each one of these technologies interacts with data in different ways: they have diverse functions. Ultimately, harnessing data is a fundamental part of this new wave of technology.

Internet of Things (IoT) collects data

In an Internet of Things (IoT) system, computing devices, mechanical and digital machines, objects, animals or people are all interrelated with the use of unique identifiers (UIDs), and with which they can collect and transfer data over a network without requiring human-to-human or human-to-computer interaction.

IoT technology is used in the consumer, enterprise, industrial, and government market segments, each of which produce massive amounts of data, generally of the unstructured variety, requiring data technologies for management and processing.

This is where Artificial Intelligence enters the scene…

Artificial Intelligence (AI) processes and analyses data

With the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithms, we enhance the ability of big data analytics and IoT platforms to provide value to each of these market segments. AI algorithms can be trained to manage and process data according to certain standards. This feature turns raw data into meaningful information, which is then useful for decision-making purposes.

This chart shows forecasted cumulative global artificial intelligence revenue 2016–2025, by use case.

Blockchain stores and distributes data

In the blockchain realm, data and decentralisation enjoy a powerful relationship. Data can be fed into blockchain networks securely and privately, avoiding centralised storage. Blockchain can be used as the foundation for decentralised data storage providers.

Because of the architecture of blockchain networks, data stored on them is immutable and cannot be forged, making it a highly secure technology for preventing fraud.

The “essential eight” technologies are evolving rapidly, becoming increasingly more sophisticated and equally complex, also prompting questions around legislation and ethical uses of data. The scenario leaves plenty of room for further research and discussion about how technology can help drive society forward without compromising rights and principles.

Cassiopeia Services is a key partner and the official PR/Media representative of the World Ethical Data Forum (WEDF), a leading global organisation that embraces the full spectrum of interrelated issues around the use and future of data.

We are working with WEDF on its next Global Forum set to take place in London in 2020. Dates, venue and keynote speakers will be announced in due course.

For more information about how to get involved, drop us an email at cassiopeia@worldwthicaldata.org

Cassiopeia Services partners with World Ethical Data Forum

Cassiopeia Services Ltd., the innovative London-based PR/IR agency, is pleased to announce it has been chosen to manage the Public Relations, Media Partnerships and Sponsorships for the World Ethical Data Forum (WEDF), a leading global organisation that embraces the full spectrum of interrelated issues around the use and future of data.

Founded by Stefania Barbaglio in 2015, Cassiopeia is a global PR and IR agency with a strong focus on and experience in the new technology and innovation sector. Since 2017, Cassiopeia has focused on delivering strong communications strategies for companies and startups in the blockchain and technology sector. Stefania is a London based eclectic entrepreneur and well-recognised PR expert, presenter and speaker, international journalist and qualified blockchain strategist by the University of Oxford.

In 2018, the first edition of the WEDF in Barcelona, Spain brought together the most prominent data experts such as Julian Assange and Dr. Ralph Merkle. The streamed event received 2.4 million YouTube views in a single week.

WEDF is the single most important event in the worldwide data realm. In 2020, the WEDF will approach the intersecting questions around data use in the Information Age, diving into conversations on data analysis, use and regulation; data privacy; future of data and new technologies; fake news and responsible journalism; data intelligence/security intersection and censorship; and future of democracy. The date and venue will be announced in due course.

Data has become one of the most valuable assets in the global economy: as important a commodity as oil, according to specialists. In these times of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, data is the common factor underlying many technologies and shaping up the future of society. This unprecedented use of data urges the construction of new social, political and economic systems, which are better fitted to address the data economy.

Stefania Barbaglio, Director at Cassiopeia Services commented: “I am delighted to be working with the WEDF to promote their next edition. Cassiopeia is always at the forefront of innovation and we recognise the power of data and the revolution happening with development of data technologies. This also poses big ethical questions and challenges which require serious dialogue and practical solutions. The WEDF is the place for those discussions to happen.”

John David Marshall, CEO of the WEDF commented: “The issues we’re dealing with are so important historically that having the right team in place able to comprehend them and cope with the enormity of the challenges they present is vital. I’m looking forward to the work ahead, and to what we’ll accomplish together.”

For more information about how to get involved, please email stefania@worldethicaldata.org

Golden Saint Technologies launches new partnership at leading ICT Conference in Southeast Asia

Golden Saint Technologies (GST), the London-listed integrated information and communication technology infrastructure solutions provider, has announced partnership with P2 Mobile Technologies to provide Wireless Mesh, a fast and advanced set of ICT tools addressing the growing needs of the Smart City market.

Smart Cities are designed to address and reduce structural inefficiencies, as well as to prepare urban areas for future growth and the coming generations. The aim of hyperconnected, smart cities is to deploy technologies to make optimal use of resources, increase social inclusion and create a better environment.The engineering behind the structure of smart cities combines multiple digital tools such as location sensing, cloud computing and mobile connectivity.

The global ICT market has grown consistently over the last decade. By next year, forecasts show that the global ICT market, including TV and video services, will be worth a total of more than 4.4 trillion euros.The Asia-Pacific region, where the GST hub is located, tops the tables on smart city strategies, making up 42 percent of global investments in smart city technology initiatives.

Research by McKinsey estimates that smart-mobility applications could create up to $70 billion in value, while forecasts suggest that by 2023 the smart cities market will be a US$7.6 billion Telco opportunity for mobile service providers (MSP) and network vendors.

The company announced the new product at the 2018 BICSI Southeast Asia conference in Singapore, with focus on ‘Smart Innovations: Infrastructure to Empower Future Technologies’.

BICSI influences the vision of advancing the global information and communications technology (ICT) industry by connecting ICT professionals with the solutions that inspire revolutionary ICT advancements.

The conference gathered prominent firms within the ICT space and provided a valuable avenue for networking and partnership opportunities: “Through BICSI and other associations, we have good contacts with local ICT installers and system integrators throughout the region,” commented Garies Chong, CEO of GST and BICSI Southeast Asia District Chair.

“This means it is straightforward for GST to reach out to active local partners in the Southeast Asia territories, and to quickly identify and execute on local Wireless Mesh sales opportunities.”

GST is strategically positioned in the ICT (Information and Communication Technology) market and designed to take its place in this sphere. Although the company operates worldwide, its hub is in Asia, where the ICT industry is brewing and expanding at a fast pace, fuelling multiple opportunities for GST.

China aims to be a leader in AI by 2030

The Chinese government is on a mission to place the country as a world leader in Artificial Intelligence by 2030. Along with the United States, China currently shares the top destinations in tech development. Aiming to get to the global pole position, China is ramping up its strategy, focusing mainly on AI by heavily investing in research, development and applications of AI into diverse areas.

The government plan released in 2017, forecasts that its domestic AI industry will be worth US$150 billion by 2030. “By 2030, we shall make artificial intelligence theory, technology, and application at the world’s leading level,” the Chinese Government said in the release of its top-level AI plan.

China has identified 17 key areas for AI development in China, among them smart vehicles, intelligent service robots, intelligent drones, neural network chips, and intelligent manufacturing, for examples; as well as bringing the value of AI to all levels throughout the supply chain.

In the near-term future, China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) hopes to thrive in smart chips for autonomous driving, intelligent vehicle algorithms, and vehicle communications. Over the coming three years, Beijing expects to increase in the size of the AI industry by ten times.

The signs of the AI revolution in China are already visible. Earlier in November, state news agency Xinhua unveils the world’s first AI news anchor who can report ‘tirelessly’ 24 hours a day.

The steps to achieve global dominance reflect the amount of funding destined to technology and AI firms in China. Last year, 48 percent of total global funding of AI startups globally came from China, compared to 38 percent funded by the US, and 13 per cent by the rest of the world.

To be able to sustain the growth of the industry, investments in education and training are hugely necessary — and Chinese authorities do not miss this. From 2019, Chinese pupils will start having AI lessons in primary and secondary schools. According to Xinhua, pilot projects already started running in Shanghai.

In universities, doctoral students who pursue AI-related majors can be paid as high as 800,000 yuan (US$115,234) per year, representing an increase of up to 60 percent from the annual salary of 500,000 yuan (US$72,021) in 2017, says a NetEase report.

Smart Asia: Asian countries lead the race to develop smart cities

The strategy and development of AI applications couples with advancements in terms of implementing smart technologies into urban centres to create the so-called ‘smart cities’.

Governments across Asia are embracing disruptive technologies such as Internet of Things (IoT), artificial intelligence (AI) and blockchain to create effective solutions for the challenges faced by megacities.

The second leading smart city in the world is Singapore, where intelligent transportation and mobility system which have been in place for more than 10 years.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India launched a strategy in 2015 to build 100 smart cities in the country. The initiative seeks to invest more than $15 billion over the next few years to develop and implement efficient infrastructure and management solutions.

The engineering behind the structure of smart cities combines multiple digital tools such as location sensing, cloud computing and mobile connectivity.

McKinsey estimates that smart-mobility applications could create up to $70 billion in value and forecasts suggest that by 2023 the smart cities market will be a US$7.6 billion Telco opportunity for mobile service providers (MSP) and network vendors.

Despite the figures above, the real positive impact of smart cities cannot be measured in economic growth or market size; it is instead reflected in a better quality of life, more effective public services and sustainable lifestyle.

“Asian countries are very forward-thinking and famous for welcoming technology and innovation. There is a huge scope for growth in this area and tech companies should be in the lookout for opportunities,” says Stefania Barbaglio, director at Cassiopeia Services.

As we welcome the fourth industrial revolution, and let innovation keep on improving our lives, more systems are set to transform, bringing positive changes to society. Watch this space for more updates on technology projects in emerging markets. Subscribe to our FinancialFox YouTube channel for all the latest developments and news.

The future is both smart and kind: Google moves forward with AI to promote social change

The digital revolution is more than just the digitalisation of businesses and services: it is about shaping the economy to be more inclusive, fair and human-centric. The multi-billion tech industry seems to be waking up to the fact that, in this field, success means extending consideration to people and the planet.

After years of heavy investment in and research into innovative tools to create and improve user experience online, Google has now pledged to deploying its expertise to develop technologies for social good.

A main focus for Google is artificial intelligence applications for positive societal impact. Since the launch of Google AI last year, the tech giant has been engaged in various enterprises within the AI space as it seeks projects that deploy this technology to positively impact society.

Whilst technology has proven to be the key for social change in the digital era, innovation is a fluid process and requires corporate responsibility from tech companies in addressing some of the most important questions underlying society. Fundamentally, technology is only truly powerful if it is accessible by and inclusive to all, rather than remaining a tool for the few, developed and used by the intellectual elites of the world.

Despite being a couple years on from the big AI boom, machine learning is still a very dynamic and evolving technology. Its influences are already palpable and visible in our everyday life, such as intelligent personal assistants on our smartphones and algorithms on social media and streaming services.

A true AI system is one that can learn on its own, improving on past iterations, getting ever smarter and more aware and enhancing its capabilities and knowledge. For example, algorithms that recognise patterns are applied in trading and financing. The fact that we are able to use such complex technology in such simple terms is a testimony to what computers are capable of, when utilised efficiently.

On top of that, the AI market is doubtless attractive: Bank of America Merrill reckon the market will blossom to $153bn over the next five years — $83bn for robots, and $70bn for artificial intelligence-based systems. That compares to roughly $58bn in 2014.

The integration of AI into different sectors surely has the potential to boost Google’s already developed services to the next level. In fact, AI is set to become of the main drivers behind the tech improving customer experience in financial services, manufacturing and entertainment, among other fields.

Nevertheless, AI is not a complete redemption technology, and the technological developments made without human input are not enough to ensure that AI is completely fair and transparent. The responses provided by machine learning replicate the patterns on which they are constructed, so inevitably reflect the views and perspectives of its developers.

So, how can an AI systems empathise with socially excluded groups if the creators themselves are not able to understand the problems of demographics other than their own? After all, AI can only solve the problems it is programmed to identify. In this sense, automated systems call for human sensitivity and mechanisms of trust.

Challenging the biases found within artificially intelligent mechanisms is one of the greatest concerns around the diffusion of AI systems into different sectors. The answer could be in the coupling of AI with decentralised technologies such as blockchain, to ensure the opening of so-called ‘black box’, which prevents users from accessing the built-in algorithm that works like an engine to AI systems.

Google signals more moves to promote AI as a force for social good

A number of entities have engaged in promoting socially-conscious machine learning. Google has shown proactivity in taking AI operations into various sectors where automated systems can bring greater benefits The company is also entering promising partnerships with universities and the public sector to contribute its expertise to improve social services.

In a recent partnership with Harvard University, Google’s new AI system has been deployed to assess food safety records in restaurants in cities in the US via a machine learning model that scans online searches indicative of food poisoning, then looking up restaurants visited by the users who performed those searches. Lastly, for each applicable restaurant, it calculates the proportion of people who ate there and later showed evidence of foodborne illnesses in their searches.

In the UK, DeepMind, the tech lab powered by Google, and world leader hub in artificial intelligence research and its application for positive impact, is partnering with the NHS to improve service tools and analyse test results more quickly to ensure faster treatment.

After receiving strong public backlash due over a controversial military contract using AI, Google is now showing commitment to deploying its AI operations into positive impact projects.

“Careful ethical analysis can help us understand which potential uses of vision technology are inappropriate, harmful, or intrusive. And ethical decision-making practices can help us reason better about challenging dilemmas and complex value tradeoffs — such as whether to prioritise transparency or privacy in an AI application where providing more of one may mean less of the other,” wrote Rajen Sheth, director of product management for Cloud AI for Google.

In an initiative called ‘AI Impact Challenge’ Google is also providing $25million in funding via its non-profit arm, Google.org, to humanitarian projects that use Google’s machine learning technology, placing a particular interest in projects that further social and environmental good. The team is looking for practical, feasible and scalable solutions that address societal challenges, going beyond simple use-case scenarios to becoming an indispensable tool for social and environmental revolution.

In times of fast-paced tech advancements, innovation is key for the companies to keep themselves up-to-speed in this constantly regenerating market and offer cutting edge tools addressing use cases. Yet, as society grows more conscious and the consumer market demands ethically-committed companies, corporate responsibility becomes a priority and a mission.

“There is no doubt that Artificial Intelligence and Blockchain are the two most-discussed disruptive technologies in the last years, which are set to disrupt the tech and business paradigm in a big way over the next decade. In many ways, the two are conceptual opposites: AI, which reached its peak in 2016–2017, is very much centralised and closed; whereas blockchain, which boomed a year later, powers open-source decentralised systems, says Stefania Barbaglio director at Cassiopeia Services, leading PR agency in the blockchain space.

“However, the future is the intersection and integration of both. Their combined power is huge: maximising scalability security, transparency and decentralisation, and efficiency via fully decentralised AI marketplace networks, and decentralised autonomous organisations (DAO). A new paradigm is taking shape.“

This is a post on Cassiopeia’s AI series. Stay tuned for more insights into AI and Blockchain integration and positive social impact by disruptive technologies.

Blockchain and AI: Smart, secure systems set to bring value across various sectors

Last week we introduced you to Artificial intelligence (AI), the technology enabling computers to take decisions independently. Even if we don’t notice it, the truth is that the evolution of AI has already made our day-to-day lives a lot simpler and more efficient. Examining this development even further, AI features can be magnified when coupled with blockchain. This collaboration of two distinct yet powerful technologies has the potential to disrupt almost every business we know today.

Blockchain and Artificial Intelligence are two of the defining technologies of the new phase in tech revolution. These emerging technologies are rapidly evolving, catalysing innovation, entering multiple markets and, ultimately, challenging old, entrenched ways of doing business.

Just like years ago when the internet took over multiple aspects of our lives, spurring the emergence of the information technology (IT) sector, this new wave of technologies including artificial intelligence and blockchain is rapidly gaining ground worldwide.

The fact that we are able to use such complex technology in such simple terms is a testimony to what computers are capable of, when utilised efficiently. This is leading us towards another technology milestone that is speculated to bring about yet another revolution once it matures.

The coupling of blockchain and AI accentuates the disruptive power of these two technologies, bringing about their strongest features to add value to established systems.

The possibility of creating smart, open-sourced secure systems is set to bring levels of convenience and security never seen before to virtually any process involving data records.

The ultimate purpose of blockchain-based systems is to keep track of large amounts of data and provide a secure database accessible only and equally by participants of that network. The objective of AI, on the other hand, is to develop algorithms to assess data in an intelligent manner.

AI and blockchain are indeed two separate technologies with differing objectives, yet they can complement each other to create better and more efficient structures. Combining AI and blockchain leads to highly intelligent and decentralised systems.

AI and blockchain certainly have the power of enhancing each other’s performances. One example, as highlighted in Forbes, is that a blockchain platform can help us track and understand the decisions made by AI. For the time being, most AI systems still require some form of human verification, but as AI becomes more sophisticated, it is likely that these systems will get more autonomous. Having a trustworthy mechanism to keep record of these decisions is a must.

Similarly, well-crafted AI will be able to manage blockchain more effectively than humans, and also enable less energy-consuming mining, which is currently one of the main hindrances to be overcome in the blockchain revolution.

The decentralised feature of blockchain is again shining bright as blockchain itself is a consolidate database shifting the monopoly of the market into the hands of the common people. It thus allows for AI to be democratised and developed through a community-based spirit.

“The secret weapon here is really crypto-economics: the ability to create a mini-economy where participants accrue and exchange value through tokens. Because they incentivise people to participate in the network early, tokens help solve the cold start problem which has plagued so many network-building efforts in the past,” writes Matt Ruck.

AI + Blockchain market

Although at the moment we see more academic work than practical application of this technology combination, this reality is set to shift in the near future as more deployments come about. The market for the mergeing of these two technologies is starting to shape up as projects are gathering momentum.

We can indeed see a rise in the number of companies that have started to deploy AI and blockchain together, to a variety of ends.

Projects to watch: Nebula AI

Nebula AI is one of the first organisations to have identified the market need of this merger, and has started combining Blockchain and AI to carry its projects. The company provides a medium for people to deploy their specific AI applications on the blockchain.

Nebula also allows its users to convert their mining power via their personal computer processor to AI computing power. It basically gives the people a chance to deal with neural networks in a much more transparent and secure environment.

The people who are new to this concept and are getting acquainted with the AI/ blockchain combination have a chance to deploy their customised applications on the blockchain. Nebula allows for decentralised AI applications to be built faster than ever.

With Nebula AI’s cutting-edge blockchain technology, users are able to focus on key business features. Nebula provides on-chain payment, rental computing resources and decentralised service.

This development allows Nebula AI to compete with the pricing of Amazon and Google cloud storage services.

Blockchain and AI: Smart, secure systems set to bring value across various sectors

Last week we introduced you to Artificial intelligence (AI), the technology enabling computers to take decisions independently. Even if we don’t notice it, the truth is that the evolution of AI has already made our day-to-day lives a lot simpler and more efficient. Examining this development even further, AI features can be magnified when coupled with blockchain. This collaboration of two distinct yet powerful technologies has the potential to disrupt almost every business we know today.

Blockchain and Artificial Intelligence are two of the defining technologies of the new phase in tech revolution. These emerging technologies are rapidly evolving, catalysing innovation, entering multiple markets and, ultimately, challenging old, entrenched ways of doing business.

Just like years ago when the internet took over multiple aspects of our lives, spurring the emergence of the information technology (IT) sector, this new wave of technologies including artificial intelligence and blockchain is rapidly gaining ground worldwide.

The fact that we are able to use such complex technology in such simple terms is a testimony to what computers are capable of, when utilised efficiently. This is leading us towards another technology milestone that is speculated to bring about yet another revolution once it matures.

The coupling of blockchain and AI accentuates the disruptive power of these two technologies, bringing about their strongest features to add value to established systems.

The possibility of creating smart, open-sourced secure systems is set to bring levels of convenience and security never seen before to virtually any process involving data records.

The ultimate purpose of blockchain-based systems is to keep track of large amounts of data and provide a secure database accessible only and equally by participants of that network. The objective of AI, on the other hand, is to develop algorithms to assess data in an intelligent manner.

AI and blockchain are indeed two separate technologies with differing objectives, yet they can complement each other to create better and more efficient structures. Combining AI and blockchain leads to highly intelligent and decentralised systems.

AI and blockchain certainly have the power of enhancing each other’s performances. One example, as highlighted in Forbes, is that a blockchain platform can help us track and understand the decisions made by AI. For the time being, most AI systems still require some form of human verification, but as AI becomes more sophisticated, it is likely that these systems will get more autonomous. Having a trustworthy mechanism to keep record of these decisions is a must.

Similarly, well-crafted AI will be able to manage blockchain more effectively than humans, and also enable less energy-consuming mining, which is currently one of the main hindrances to be overcome in the blockchain revolution.

The decentralised feature of blockchain is again shining bright as blockchain itself is a consolidate database shifting the monopoly of the market into the hands of the common people. It thus allows for AI to be democratised and developed through a community-based spirit.

“The secret weapon here is really crypto-economics: the ability to create a mini-economy where participants accrue and exchange value through tokens. Because they incentivise people to participate in the network early, tokens help solve the cold start problem which has plagued so many network-building efforts in the past,” writes Matt Ruck.

AI + Blockchain market

Although at the moment we see more academic work than practical application of this technology combination, this reality is set to shift in the near future as more deployments come about. The market for the mergeing of these two technologies is starting to shape up as projects are gathering momentum.

We can indeed see a rise in the number of companies that have started to deploy AI and blockchain together, to a variety of ends.

Projects to watch: Nebula AI

Nebula AI is one of the first organisations to have identified the market need of this merger, and has started combining Blockchain and AI to carry its projects. The company provides a medium for people to deploy their specific AI applications on the blockchain.

Nebula also allows its users to convert their mining power via their personal computer processor to AI computing power. It basically gives the people a chance to deal with neural networks in a much more transparent and secure environment.

The people who are new to this concept and are getting acquainted with the AI/ blockchain combination have a chance to deploy their customised applications on the blockchain. Nebula allows for decentralised AI applications to be built faster than ever.

With Nebula AI’s cutting-edge blockchain technology, users are able to focus on key business features. Nebula provides on-chain payment, rental computing resources and decentralised service.

This development allows Nebula AI to compete with the pricing of Amazon and Google cloud storage services.

Understanding Artificial Intelligence: Technology meets Human Potential

Becoming increasingly part of our everyday lives, Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications are evolving quickly and becoming ever-more sophisticated. From personal assistants to self-driving cars, AI is re-shaping fundamental aspects of society and opening up a variety of possibilities within the tech sector.

Artificial Intelligence is the simulation of human intelligence processed by machines, mainly computer systems. The processes mainly include learning, reasoning and self-correction. With the increase in speed, size and diversity of data, AI has gained its dominance in businesses globally and brings benefits wherever it is applied.

AI can perform several tasks, such as recognising patterns in data more efficiently than a human, offering deeper insights to businesses. A true AI system is one that can learn on its own, can improve on past iterations, getting ever smarter and more aware and enhancing its capabilities and knowledge.

Whether we realise it or not, we are surrounded by AI in many areas of our lives and this reality is bound to increase. With the next decade being forecasted to mainly focus on AI systems such as autonomously-powered self-driving vehicles, the AI industry boasts of evolving into a more powerful, predictive environment. Some of the mainstream examples of AI in everyday life are the virtual assistants we can find on our phones.

Everyone is familiar with Apple’s personal assistant, Siri. She’s the friendly voice-activated computer that we interact with on a daily basis. She helps us find information, gives us directions, adds events to our calendars, helps us send messages and so on. Siri is a pseudo-intelligent digital personal assistant. She uses machine-learning technology to get smarter and better able to predict and understand our natural-language questions and requests.

Netflix provides highly accurate predictive technology based on customer’s reactions to films. It analyses billions of records to suggest films that you might like, based on your previous reactions film choices. This tech is getting smarter and smarter by the year as the dataset grows. However, the tech’s only drawback is that independent movies go unnoticed, while big-named features balloon on the platform.

The AI Market: Opportunities in expansion

Companies acting on the AI space have been enjoying a fruitful period over the last couple years as the world starts to grasp the potential of this technology.

Machines are expected to perform 42% of all current tasks in the workplace by 2022 — a jump from the current 29%. This opens up many opportunities for different companies and startups to find their niches in this growing market.

North America takes the biggest share of the market with considerable advantage, whilst Asia is on its way to surpass Europe in second place.

Seeing Machines: Leading AI systems

A veteran is the field of AI is Seeing Machines (SEE), a London-listed company who is the world leader in driver-machine interaction. Seeing team uses artificial intelligence technology that observes the driver or operator’s attention — reliably, unobtrusively, and in real time — and intervenes seamlessly when necessary.

Operating in North America, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East and Asia Pacific and with over 15 years of experience in the market, the Company has pioneered the development and commercialisation of proprietary algorithms and hardware that help machines interpret the human face and eyes in order to understand the human state.

Seeing Machines specialises in computer vision algorithms that precisely track eye gaze, head position and pupil size, and their state-of the-art AI technology analyses the data to quickly and accurately detect driver drowsiness, distraction and microsleep events. The company has developed solutions for multiple transport sectors worldwide.

Seeing started working with the off-road (mining) sector in 2006 developing the Driver Safety System (DSS) which uses head position and eye tracking to minimise fatigue and distraction in mining equipment operators and drivers. Seeing Machines’ DSS is the world’s most effective heavy vehicle driver safety system and has been adopted by multiple global industries. This product is known as Guardian

Guardian is an AI powered system connected to a 24/7 monitoring centre and cloud analytics engine that gives fleet owners a variety of customisable intervention and analytics programs.

AI system Guardian by Seeing Machines

Last August, Guardian travelled 1 billion km across 24 countries. Guardian has been used in commercial trucks and buses covering more than has detected over 3.6 million fatigue and distraction-related driver events.

“The 1.3 billion km of data we have gathered since launching Guardian underpins our clear market leadership in the development and deployment of effective driver monitoring systems that demonstrably enhance transport safety across a range of verticals,” said Ken Kroeger, CEO of Seeing Machines.

In October last year, the company launched their collaboration with Emirates Airlines to research and develop eye-tracking and facial recognition features that will enhance safety and security in airplanes.

This is the first blog in our AI series. Keep an eye for our next blog on AI and Blockchain and understanding the power of these two ground breaking technologies coming together.

If you want to get involved in AI either as an investor or entrepreneur, we are not short of opportunities for you to explore the best projects in the AI space:

Make sure you register for TechNOVA AI in London, on October 15 and get a 10% discount with the code ‘cassiopeia10’.

If you are based in continental Europe, don’t miss Fintech+, a leading AI conference and marketplace in Switzerland, on October 1–2.